Beta cell proliferation

10 December, 2018

Autoimmune diabetes is a disease where the immune system attacks and destroy healthy tissue, in this case the beta cells in the islet of Langerhans in the pancreas (1). It leads to absolute insulin deficiency and a lifelong treatment with insulin through injections or an insulin pump. There is no way to prevent the disease in humans, even though we since long time can detect biomarkers that the disease is developing (perhaps most exciting so far 2). There is no viable cure, but many promising trials is ongoing at different places around the world.

 

CHALLENGES WITH A CURE

A lot of experiments try to replace the destroyed beta cells with primarily stem cells, which is the most interesting area of research. There are many challenges to overcome, the most important are:

 

  • Today’s islet transplantations means we use donor islet which is limited of natural reasons. The procedure has developed a lot since the Edmonton protocol in 2000 (3), and even though many still needs exogenous administration of insulin this method helps many people to a better life. Until now ~2000 islet transplantations have been done in the world (4). Except lack of donor islets, another reason this method is not more widely uses is that the patient must take immunosuppressant drugs (anti-rejection drugs) the rest of the life. These might have adverse effects such as “mouth ulcers, anemia (low red blood cells that cause symptoms of tiredness), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, leg edema (swelling), high cholesterol or fat levels in the blood, liver problems, high blood pressure, fatigue, kidney problems, abnormal menstrual periods in women, and an increased risk of infection. Anti-rejection medications may also increase the risk of developing cancer.” (5). One of the clinics very efficient in this area is Uppsala University in Sweden, they write about the purpose “the main target with islet cell transplantation is to prevent severe and life-threatening hypoglycemias and hyperglycemias”.
  • If we could supply with cells that somehow is our own cells, how will the immune system react? There are a number of studies that have shown that many patients long after diagnose have persisting autoantibodies long after diagnose. Particular those with adult onset autoimmune diabetes and overall, those with the autoantibody GADA had positive test and less of children with autoantibody ICA (6). What does this mean, if replacing insulin secretion, will the new cells be attacked and destroyed? We don´t know, we are not able to replace beta cells today but most probably yes – the new cells would be destroyed in patients with remained autoantibodies. That said even though “Current evidence suggests that loss of function and destruction of beta cells begins after the onset of autoimmunity signalled by beta cell autoantibodies. Beta cell destruction may be precipitated by the innate immune system and inflammation, and activated autoreactive lymphocytes are believed to carry out most of the actual beta cell damage.” (7).
  • To solve the above, avoid destruction of replaced cells and/or immunosuppressant’s, there are many trials working on encapsulation of cells. Both beta cells from donors but as I wrote above its limited supply, so preferably use of stem cells derived beta cells. This solution is indeed very interesting, I will write more about this in a separate article. Status for now is of course no, it doesn´t work yet.
  • No matter how to one day resolve insulin secretion, for a viable cure we must know the etiology of the disease and be able to inhibit the autoreactive process. Personally I feel this research is neglected quite often. The incidence for autoimmune diabetes have increased dramatically in many countries, a new study a week ago showed a 3% increased incidence per year in 25 European countries 8. In Sweden, with the second highest incidence in the world after our neighbour Finland, and with a population of 10 million, 900 children and at least 900 adults are diagnosed every year. The development is sad, and have huge health economic impact as well.

 

 

OTHER WAYS TO RESOLVE INSULIN SECRETION?

One interesting research area has for years been to look in to the remaining beta cells we all have. Since many years’ it´s well established that all people with autoimmune diabetes have absolute insulin deficiency sooner and with LADA later, but all still have minor amount of beta cells left. Not contradictory. At diagnose in general 80-90% of the beta cells are lost, this is generally accepted (9). The destruction continues over time, different in different people. Please note that the remaining amount is so small nobody with absolute insulin deficiency can live without exogenous insulin, even if only drinking water and eating lettuce every day.

Unfortunately we have no method to analyse beta cells death, we can only measure C-peptide (10). This is done in several well controlled studies (11, 12, 13) and has led to the questions;

 

  • Why are some cells not attacked?
  • Or are they attacked but survive of some reason?
  • Can we use this knowledge somehow, to regenerate beta cells?

 

 

Why a few cells are not attacked we don´t know. Kevan Herold with colleagues showed last year that “During the development of diabetes, there are changes in beta cells so you end up with two populations of beta cells. One population is killed by the immune response. The other population seems to acquire features that render it less susceptible to killing.” (Yale press release 14, the study 15). The new subpopulation of beta cells becomes Btm cells, a stem cells like condition. The Btm cells express molecules that inhibit the immune response. This is one theory, among others. Very visual picture from the paper:

 

 

For decades there have been a theory that progenitor cells do exist in the pancreas. Progenitors are kind of descendants of adult stem cells that can be self-renewed and differentiated into mature cell types, DRI write in the paper below; “cells that exhibit a variable degree of potency and proliferation potential. The potency and role of adult progenitor cells is organ and context-specific”. Some years ago this hypothesis was challenged and researchers meant what we do see is basically self-replication, the differences are several but particular if self-replication is what we see, the capacity is limited due to the small fraction of the beta cells surviving years after onset. In any case the studies above shows declining insulin production (C-peptide) from an already low level, so the regeneration of cells that eventually do occur is not clinical relevant. What is very interesting, if we are able to solve the autoimmunity, can we affect regeneration?

 

 

HOW TO TAKE IT FROM THERE?

In animals, beta cell proliferation occur quite often. Proliferation means events that leads to increasing amount of cells, particular cell division bot not exclusively. Clinical relevant beta cell proliferation doesn´t happen in humans. If it would be possible to regenerate beta cells in people with absolute insulin deficiency, all improvement would though have impact on glucose control. Most probably not to the extent as a cure. One study about beta cell proliferation was published last week, the week before another about what decides the fate of a progenitor cell (read more below) to be an insulin producing beta cell and the third news is a very exciting human trial just started in Sweden. Different research but the idea is similar: to restore insulin production, partly or totally.

 

 

DIABETES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

DRI at the University of Miami published a paper in “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” 4th of December, where the researchers demonstrate that yes – there are progenitors in human adult pancreas (full paper 16, article from DRI 17). The major difference between progenitors and stem cells in the case of resolving insulin production is that stem cells as of today either needs immunosuppressant’s if we use human embryonic stem cells, or we need a method for encapsulation, which still might need immunosuppressant’s. If we are able to use iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cells) one day, we might avoid immunosuppressant’s. This is the most exciting area of research as a potential cure for insulin-treated diabetes but not close to reality, it will take years and we don´t see human trials yet, except from approaching other diseases, in Japan (18). The progenitor cells are our own cells meaning no immunosuppressant’s needed, but can they be stimulated and turned into insulin producing beta cells, cause neogenesis (“de novo formation, e. g., of b-cells from non-b-cells. When applied to the generation of a new differentiated cell, this concept is usually presented as an alternative to self-replication e.g., a b-cell giving rise to two b-cells by proliferation”. Dictionary from DRI above)? We will see.

 

 

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN

Researchers from University of Copenhagen in Denmark and the Helmholtz Zentrum München German research center for environmental research, lead by Professor Henrik Semb, showed in Nature two weeks ago mapping of the signals that determine the fate of the progenitor cells in a lab. Semb describes their finding here in a short clip from the university 19. When the cells are expressed for a certain protein they become endocrine cells, and another protein they become duct cells (see DRI´s paper above with a small dictionary). This is regulated by a signalling system called Notch, known since decades but unknown how Notch is turned on/off. Semb describes the process as a pinball game in the clip above, depending on which pin they hits decide the fate. The knowledge can be used how to produce more efficient insulin producing beta cells from human stem cells in lab. At the same time stem cells research are making progresses and it´s a very exciting area with huge potential for many diseases, it´s still challenging in many ways and particular the tumorigenic risk is not fully understood. Semb´s team said last year; “Although significant progress has been made towards making insulin producing beta cells in vitro (in the lab), we are still exploring how to mass-produce mature beta cells to meet the future clinical needs. Our current study contributes with valuable knowledge on how to address key technical challenges such as safety, purity and cost-effective manufacturing, aspects that if not confronted early on, could hinder stem cell therapy from becoming a clinically and commercially viable treatment in diabetes.” (20).

 My question was, can Sembs team’s protocol be used at the progenitor cells in a human pancreas as well, for self-replication and as the procedure DRI describes above? Not as a cure but until we knows more about risks with stem cells, to improve glucose management and control? I asked Professor Semb; “Probably not, our finding is not related to how progenitors divide, neither in organ development nor in a human adult. Our finding is rather how progenitors are instructed to develop to certain cell types, i.e. beta cells. This is useful to more efficient control that progenitors from stem cells becomes beta cells and nothing else”.

 The paper 21.

 

 

HUMAN TRIAL

It´s known that the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA, is important in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Research have showed different levels of GABA in people with diabetes compared with healthy individuals. GABA is synthesized by an enzyme called GAD from the amino acid glutamate in nerve cells but also, importantly, in the insulin-producing beta cells in pancreatic islets (22). GAD has two forms, GAD65 and GAD67, and in type 1 diabetes the most common form of autoantibody is to GAD65, often referred to as GADA.

The roles of GABA in islets are many and one is to inhibit toxic white blood cells. An international research group led by Professor Per-Ola Carlsson at Uppsala University in Sweden, spring 2018 published two papers where they had isolated immune cells from human blood and studied the effects GABA had on these cells. First, they were able to determine GABA concentration in human islets, and showed that ion channels that GABA opens became more sensitive to GABA in type 2 diabetes and that GABA helps regulate insulin secretion (23). In the other paper they show that GABA inhibited the immune cells and reduced the secretion of a large number of inflammatory molecules (24.

 

Diamyd Medical is a Swedish company with several human trials ongoing, with different approach (the company 25, trials 26). Diamyd has developed a tablet, Remygen, based on GABA that in an experimental trial will be tested in humans at two different places (27). GABA together with Diamyd (antigen-specific immunotherapy, a vaccine) at University of Alabama (see more information in the link about trials above) and only GABA in 30 adult patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than five years (study name ReGenerate-1). I asked Professor Carlsson, leader of ReGenerate-1 about status, and first patient started last Monday. Still looking for participants. First phase of ReGenerate-1 is an initial safety and dose escalation part comprising six patients, and the main trial comprising 24 patients that will be followed for up to nine months depending on the dosage group they belong to. After safety evaluation, the plan is to see if Remygen can regenerate insulin producing cells, meaning increased own production of insulin. Final results planned in 2020, according to Carlsson. Personally I´m sceptic by nature, so I doubt this might be a cure. But again, all improvement in management of the disease that is possible is helpful for millions of people with insulin dependent diabetes, so I will follow up this for sure.

 

 

SUMMARY

There is obviously beta cells left in all with autoimmune diabetes, clinical irrelevant and still the disease means absolute deficiency. If and how those cells can be saved, increased or if they provide useful information how to resolve insulin production, is unknown today. There is a number of projects that try to convert alpha cells in the islet of Langerhans to beta cells, alpha cells are not attacked and destroyed in people with autoimmune diabetes. More about that in another article since I´m waiting for some results.

Research learns us more continuously, the human body is indeed complex. There won´t be a viable cure or a possible solution for increased insulin production until autoimmunity is solved, but if the researchers one day might be able to do that we rely on a method that doesn´t involve immunosuppressant’s. Otherwise it won´t be a solution for the majority.

Even though diabetes research suffer due to lack of donations there are exciting projects ongoing, in humans as well. Human trials are beyond important, even if experimental as with GABA we must move to humans to proceed. For this, diabetes research need funding since these trials are expensive.

As I wrote in the beginning, everything that might improve the management are beyond important. For a functional cure there are many challenges to tackle and a long way to go, but we will definitely continue to see small steps in a positive direction. Personally, I´m totally convinced we will see a cure, not in the near future and not if organisations get more funding.

 

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  3. https://www.touchendocrinology.com/articles/progress-islet-transplantation-over-last-15-years
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nrendo.2016.178
  5. https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/islet-cell-transplantation-program/ict-patient-information/islet-cell-transplantation-faqs
  6. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  7. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4308-1
  8. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-018-4763-3
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362259/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  11. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  12. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  13. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2018/05/14/dc18-0465
  14. https://news.yale.edu/2017/02/09/yale-scientists-study-how-some-insulin-producing-cells-survive-type-1-diabetes
  15. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30040-2
  16. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/file/research-publications/2018_Pancreatic-Progenitors-There-and-Back-Again_Trends-in-Endocrinology-and-Metabolism.pdf
  17. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/is-the-pancreas-regeneration-debate-settled
  18. https://www.jmaj.jp/detail.php?id=10.31662%2Fjmaj.2018-0005
  19. https://vimeo.com/303012751
  20. https://www.eurostemcell.org/de/towards-safe-and-scalable-cell-therapy-type-1-diabetes-simplifying-beta-cell-differentiation
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0762-2
  22. https://www.uu.se/en/news-media/news/article/?id=10440&typ=artikel
  23. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30098-7/fulltext
  24. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30103-8/fulltext
  25. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/About.aspx 
  26. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/clinicalTrials.aspx
  27. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/pressClips.aspx?ClipID=3085588

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 


 

Autoimmun diabetes är en sjukdom där immunförsvaret angriper och förstör frisk vävnad, i detta fallet betacellerna i de langerhanska öarna i bukspottskörteln (1). Det leder till absolut insulinbrist och en livslång behandling med insulin genom injektioner eller en insulinpump. Det finns inget sätt att preventivt förhindra sjukdomen hos människor, trots att vi sedan länge kan upptäcka biomarkörer för att sjukdomen är under utveckling (kanske det mest spännande preventionsförsöket skrev jag om häromdagen 2). Det finns inget funktionellt botemedel, men många lovande försök pågår på olika platser i världen.

 

UTMANINGAR MED ETT BOTEMEDEL

En rad experiment pågår för att försöka ersätta förstörda betaceller med framförarallt stamceller, vilket är det mest spännande området i detta avseende. För att komma vidare finns en mängd utmaningar, de viktigaste har jag listat ett flertal gånger i min kategori/tagg stamceller på min hemsida (http://www.diabethics.com/science/category/stamceller/):

 

  • Dagens transplantationer av ö-celler innebär att vi nyttjar celler från donatorer som innebär begränsningar av naturliga orsaker. Proceduren har utvecklats mycket sedan ”the Edmonton protocol” år 2000 (3), och även om många fortfarande behöver ta insulin har metoden hjälpt många till ett bättre liv. Tills idag har ~2000 transplantationer med ö-celler genomförts i världen (4). Utöver brist på donatorer, en annan viktig anledning till att metoden inte används oftare är att patienten resten av livet måste ta immunosuppression (avstötningsmedel). Dessa kan ge mer eller mindre otrevliga biverkningar såsom munsår, blodbrist (man blir trött), illamående, kräkningar, diarré, bensvullnad, högt kolesterol, leverproblem, högt blodtryck, trötthet, njurproblem, onormal menstruationscykel hos kvinnor och ökad infektionsrisk. De kan äve öka risken att utveckla cancer. Observera, allt detta är risk och inte utfall (5). Uppsala universitet som tillhör de främsta i världen i området, säger ”huvudmålet för ö-cellstransplantation är att förhindra svåra eller livshotande hypo- respektive hyperglykemier (28).
  • Om vi kunde lösa bristen på betaceller och insulinproduktion med något som är kroppseget, hur skulle immunförsvaret reagera? Det finns flera studier som har visat att många patienter många år efter diagnos fortsatt har autoantikroppar kvar. Särskilt de som insjuknat som vuxen och överlag de som haft autoantikroppen GADA har visat positivt test senare, mindre vanligt förekommande hos barn som haft IAA (eller ICA på engelska, (6). Vad innebär detta, om vi lyckas ersätta insulinproduktionen, kommer de nya cellerna angripas och förstöras? Vi vet inte, vi kan inte idag ersätta insulinproduktion men högst troligt ja, de nya cellerna skulle förstöras hos patienter med kvarstående autoantikroppar. Detta sagt även om det i flera år blivit allt mer tydligt att autoantikropparna är mer biomarkörer och har mindre roll i destruktionen av betaceller (7, 29).
  • För att lösa allt ovan, att undvika att ersatta celler förstörs samt immunosuppression, pågår flera försök med inkapsling av betaceller från donatorer men främst av stamceller framtagna betaceller. Jag har i kategorin stamceller ovan många artiklar i ämnet. Idag finns ingen fungerande metod men detta är ett av de mest spännande områdena för ett presumtivt botemedel mot insulinbehandlad diabetes.
  • Oavsett hur vi en dag kan återskapa insulinproduktion, för ett funktionellt botemedel måste vi veta etiologin, orsaken, till sjukdomen och kunna stoppa det autoreaktiva angreppet. Som alla som följt mig en tid vet är detta ett område jag ibland känner åsidosätts. Incidensen av autoimmun diabetes har ökat dramatiskt i många länder, liksom i Sverige, sett över sista 30 åren. En ny studie publicerades häromdagen som visade en årlig ökning om 3% i 25 länder i Europa, 8. I Sverige, med näst högst incidens i världen efter Finland och med en befolkning om 10 miljoner, insjuknar årligen 900 barn och minst lika många vuxna. Sorglig utveckling och den hälsoekonomiska effekten är dessutom mycket stor.

 

 

ANDRA SÄTT ATT LÖSA INSULINSEKRETION?

Ett intressant område har i många år varit att titta mot de kvarstående betaceller vi alla har. Det är nämligen väletablerat att alla med autoimmun diabetes har absolut insulinbrist, men samtidigt har en mycket liten mängd betaceller kvar. Inte motsägelsefullt. Vid diagnos har vi i regel förlorat 80-90% av alla betaceller, detta är väl känt (9). Destruktionen fortsätter, på lite olika sätt hos olika människor. Observera igen, de få betaceller vi har kvar att ingen med autoimmun diabetes kan leva utan tillfört insulin, oavsett om vederbörande lever på vatten och isbergssallad.

Tyvärr kan vi inte studera betacells-förlust, vi kan endast mäta C-peptid (10). Detta har gjorts i flera välkontrollerade studier (11, 12, 13) och har lett till frågorna;

  • Varför finns celler som undgår angreppet?
  • Eller, angrips de men överlever?
  • Kan detta utnyttjas på något sätt?

 

Vi vet inte idag varför en del betaceller undgår angrepp. Kevan Herold med kollegor visade förra året att vid utvecklandet av typ 1 diabetes förändras vissa betaceller till en slags subkategori, och det blir två liknande grupper men ändå olika typer av betaceller. Subkategorin undkommer det autoimmuna angreppet tack vare att de ”duckar och tar skydd för angreppet”. Cellerna framkallar molekyler som förhindrar angrepp, och de efterliknar något som liknar stamceller, dvs de backar i utvecklingsstadiet och genom detta kan de överleva angreppet och även föröka sig trots autoimmuna angreppet (artikel från Yale 14, studien 15, min artikel 30). Bilden från mitt inlägg då:

 

 

I decennier har funnits en teori om att progenitor-celler existerar i bukspottskörteln. Detta är ungefär ättlingar till stamceller som kan förnya sig själv och utvecklas till mogna/färdiga celler, DRI förklarar det bra i studien nedan; “cells that exhibit a variable degree of potency and proliferation potential. The potency and role of adult progenitor cells is organ and context-specific”. För flera år sedan utmanades denna teori och en del forskare menade att vad vi i själva verket sett är självreplikering, skillnaderna är flera men primärt är det så, att om självreplikering är vad vi sett är kapaciteten högst begränsad med anledning av hur extremt få celler som överlevt det autoimmuna angreppet. Oavsett så visar studierna ovan fortsatt avtagande insulinproduktion (C-peptid) från en redan låg nivå, så det återskapande av betaceller som eventuellt sker är inte kliniskt relevant. Men vad som är intressant är, om vi en dag kan häva autoimmuniteten, kan vi påverka återskapandet av celler?

 

 

HUR GÅ VIDARE?

Hos djur sker betacellsproliferation ganska lätt. Proliferation innebär händelser leder till ökat antal celler, främst celldelning men inte bara. Kliniskt relevant betacellsproliferation sker inte hos människor. Om vi skulle lyckas påverka återskapande av betaceller hos människor med absolut insulinbrist skulle alla eventuella förbättringar ha positiv effekt på möjligheten till glukoskontroll. Högst troligt inte som ett botemedel dock. En studie om betacellsproliferation publicerades förra veckan, veckan innan det en studie vad som bestämmer ödet för en progenitor-cell (läs mer nedan) att bli en insulinproducerande betacell och den tredje nyheten är ett mycket spännande humanförsök som precis startats i Sverige. Olika forskningsinriktningar men idén är den samma: att återskapa delar eller all insulinproduktion.

 

 

DIABETES RESEARCH INSTITUTE – DRI

DRI vid universitetet i Miami publicerade en studie den 4 december i “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” där forskarna visar att ja, det finns progenitor-celler i bukspottskörteln hos en vuxen människa (studien 16, artikel från DRI 17). Den största skillnaden i fallet att återskapa insulinproduktion mellan progenitor-celler och stamceller, är att idag måste patienten ta immunosuppressiva läkemedel om vi använder embryonala stamceller eller så måste de kapslas in, vilket fortsatt i sig kan kräva immunosuppression. Om vi en dag kan använda iPSC (inducerade pluripotenta stamceller, se mina tidigare artiklar om detta), kanske vi kan undvika immunosuppression. Detta är som sagt det mest spännande området men en lösning är inte nära, det tar år och vi ser inte ännu humanförsök, förutom att andra sjukdomar nu börjat försök med i Japan (18). Progenitor-celler är kroppsegna vilket innebär att ingen immunosuppression behövs, men kan de stimuleras till att bli insulinproducerande betaceller genom neogenes (“de novo formation, e. g., of b-cells from non-b-cells. When applied to the generation of a new differentiated cell, this concept is usually presented as an alternative to self-replication e.g., a b-cell giving rise to two b-cells by proliferation”. Från den lilla ordboken DRI har i studien ovan)? Det återstår att se.

 

 

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN

Forskare från Köpenhamns universitet samt Helmholtz Zentrum München German research center for environmental research, ledda av professor Henrik Semb, visade i Nature för två veckor sedan tjusigt de signaler som bestämmer ödet för progenitor-celler i ett lab. Semb beskriver deras fynd kort i ett klipp från universitet här 19. När cellerna uttrycks för ett visst protein blir endokrina celler, ett annat protein så blir de till duktala celler (se ordlistan igen för förklaring). Detta regleras genom ett signalsystem kallat Notch, känt i decennier men okänt hur Notch stängs av/på. Semb beskriver det likt ett flipperspel i klippet ovan, beroende på vad de träffar avgör deras öde. Kunskapen kan användas för att ta fram mer effektiva insulinproducerande betaceller från humana stamceller i lab. Samtidigt som stamcellsforskningen gör stora framsteg hela tiden och är ett otroligt spännande område med stor potential för många sjukdomar, finns utmaningar och inte minst eventuell tumörogen risk är inte tillräckligt känd. Sembs team sa förra året; Although significant progress has been made towards making insulin producing beta cells in vitro (in the lab), we are still exploring how to mass-produce mature beta cells to meet the future clinical needs. Our current study contributes with valuable knowledge on how to address key technical challenges such as safety, purity and cost-effective manufacturing, aspects that if not confronted early on, could hinder stem cell therapy from becoming a clinically and commercially viable treatment in diabetes.” (20).

 

Min omedelbara fundering var, kan det fynd Sembs team gjort användas även på progenitor-cellerna likväl, för att påverka självreplikering likt det DRI beskriver ovan? Inte som botemedel men tills vi vet mer om risker med stamceller, för att förbättra behandlingen av insulinberoende diabetes och chanserna till glukoskontroll? Jag frågade Henrik Semb; Troligen inte, vårt fynd relaterar inte hur progenitor-celler delar sig, varken i ett organ eller hos en vuxen människa. Fynden visar istället hur progenitorer instrueras att utvecklas till olika cell typer, bl a beta celler. Detta blir användbart då man vill effektivt styra progenitorer från stamceller att bli beta celler och inte någon annan cell.”

 

 Studien 21.

 

HUMANFÖRSÖK

Det är känt att nervtransmittorn gamma-aminosmörsyra (GABA) har betydelse för både autoimmun diabetes och typ 2 diabetes. Forskning har visat olika nivåer av GABA hos personer med diabetes jämför med friska individer. GABA syntetiseras med hjälp av ett enzym som kallas GAD, dels från aminosyran glutamat i nervceller, men också i de insulinproducerande betacellerna i Langerhanska öar i bukspottskörteln (22). GAD finns i två former, GAD65 och GAD67, och intressant nog är den vanligaste autoantikroppen vid autoimmun diabetes just mot GAD65, oftast benämnd bara som GADA.

GABA´s roll i cellöarna är flera och en är att hämma toxiska vita blodkroppar. En internationell forskargrupp ledd av professor Per-Ola Carlsson vid Uppsalas universitet publicerade våren 2018 två studier där de hade isolerat immunceller från blod från människor och tittat på effekten GABA haft på dessa celler. Först lyckades de bestämma GABA´s fysiologiska koncentrationsnivå i cellöar, och visade att jonkanaler som GABA öppnar blir mer känsliga för GABA vid typ 2 diabetes och att GABA hjälper att reglera insulinsekretionen (23). I den andra studien visade de att GABA hämmade immunceller och minskade utsöndring av flera inflammatoriska molekyler (24).

 

Diamyd Medical är ett svenskt företag med flera pågående kliniska studier, med lite olika inriktningar (företaget 25, försök 26). Diamyd har utvecklat ett läkemedel, Remygen, baserat på GABA som i ett experimentellt humanförsök skall testas på två olika platser (27). GABA tillsammans med Diamyd (31) vid University of Alabama (läs mer i länkarna ovan) samt endast GABA på 30 vuxna patienter som haft autoimmun diabetes mer än fem år (ReGenerate-1). Jag frågade Per-Ola om status och första patienten startade i måndags förra veckan. Första fasen är en säkerhets och doseskaleringsdel med 6 patienter, för att sedan utökas med 24 patienter till som kommer följas upp till nio månader beroende på vilken doseringsgrupp de tillhör. Efter utvärdering av säkerheten är planen att se om Remygen kan generera ökat antal betaceller och därmed ökad insulinproduktion. Slutgiltigt resultat planeras 2020 enligt Per-Ola. Av hävd är jag skeptisk så jag är tveksam till att detta är ett botemedel. Men igen, all eventuell förbättring av behandlingen av autoimmun diabetes som är möjlig innebär mycket för de miljoner världen över som har sjukdomen, så jag kommer följa upp detta naturligtvis.

 

OBS! Per-Ola bad mig om hjälp att ragga deltagare till ReGenerate-1. Kriterier är att du skall vara 18-50 år, haft autoimmun diabetes minst 5 år och ha lågt eller obefintligt C-peptid. Intresserad, kontakta studiens koordinator Rebecka.Hilmius@akademiska.se.

 

 

SUMMERING

Uppenbarligen har alla några betaceller kvar vid autoimmun diabetes, kliniskt irrelevant och fortsatt innebär sjukdomen absolut insulinbrist. Om och hur eventuellt några celler kan räddas, ökas eller om de ger värdefull information hur vi en dag kan återskapa insulinproduktion, är idag oklart. Det finns ett flertal projekt som idag försöker konvertera alfaceller i langerhanska öarna att bli betaceller, alfaceller undgår angreppet och förstörs således inte hos oss med autoimmun diabetes. Jag kommer skriva om detta igen, jag inväntar resultat från ett par studier.

Forskarna lär oss mycket hela tiden, människokroppen är uppenbarligen komplex. Det kommer inte att finnas ett funktionellt botemedel eller en lösning för förbättrad insulinproduktion förrän autoimmuniteten är löst, men om forskarna löser även den gåtan kan vi inte förlita oss på att nyttja immunosuppression. Annars kommer det inte att vara en lösning för majoriteten av oss.

Trots att diabetesforskningen lider av brist på medel pågår intressanta projekt, på människor likväl. Humanförsök är mer än viktigt, även om experimentell likt GABA så måste vi flytta från djur till människor för att komma vidare. För detta behöver forskningen medel, humanförsök är kostsamma.

Som jag skrev i början, allt som möjligen kan förbättra möjligheterna att behandla sjukdomen är väldigt viktigt. För ett funktionellt botemedel finns många utmaningar och en lång väg att gå, men vi kommer garanterat fortsättningsvis se små steg i rätt riktning. Personligen är jag fortsatt övertygad om att vi kommer se ett botemedel, inte nära i framtiden och definitivt inte om inte forskningen får medel.

 

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  3. https://www.touchendocrinology.com/articles/progress-islet-transplantation-over-last-15-years
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nrendo.2016.178
  5. https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/islet-cell-transplantation-program/ict-patient-information/islet-cell-transplantation-faqs
  6. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  7. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4308-1
  8. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-018-4763-3
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362259/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  11. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  12. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  13. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2018/05/14/dc18-0465
  14. https://news.yale.edu/2017/02/09/yale-scientists-study-how-some-insulin-producing-cells-survive-type-1-diabetes
  15. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30040-2
  16. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/file/research-publications/2018_Pancreatic-Progenitors-There-and-Back-Again_Trends-in-Endocrinology-and-Metabolism.pdf
  17. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/is-the-pancreas-regeneration-debate-settled
  18. https://www.jmaj.jp/detail.php?id=10.31662%2Fjmaj.2018-0005
  19. https://vimeo.com/303012751
  20. https://www.eurostemcell.org/de/towards-safe-and-scalable-cell-therapy-type-1-diabetes-simplifying-beta-cell-differentiation
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0762-2
  22. https://www.uu.se/en/news-media/news/article/?id=10440&typ=artikel
  23. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30098-7/fulltext
  24. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30103-8/fulltext
  25. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/About.aspx 
  26. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/clinicalTrials.aspx
  27. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/pressClips.aspx?ClipID=3085588
  28. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/Artificial-Pancreas/
  29. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/autoimmun-diabetes-etiologi/
  30. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/insulinproduktion/
  31. (Swedish only) https://www.diabethics.com/science/gad-alum/

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethicssverige/
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

Autoimmune diabetes Prevention Stamceller Stem cells Typ 1 diabetes