Category: Type 1 diabetes

Diabetes does not mean being immunocompromised

24 March, 2020

We with diabetes have since at least 35 years heard that we are, no matter type 1 or 2 diabetes, more susceptible for infections, viruses and influenza. I have personally read an enormous amount of papers that state that, but the majority are epidemiological looking at a huge group of people with diabetes. For me this is inconclusive, just a reminder that it might be so for some people. Should we really look at 425 million people in the world with diabetes as a homogenous group? (1) Of course not. But since there seems to be some association between diabetes and infections, viruses and influenza, what could be the reason? The last weeks I have spent a lot of time digging into this field of research. The evidence clearly point at a possible correlation: hyperglycemia over time, expressed as a higher HbA1c, and comorbidity. The questions that remains to be answered are if increased HbA1c itself can weaken the immune system? If so, at what level could that start to develop? Or is it rather comorbidity to blame, which often is a cause of elevated HbA1c over time? What impact has longer duration and higher age, since chances were different many years ago?

To write this article I did something I normally don´t do. I have a huge network of researchers around the globe, many belongs to the most competent in the world and among the highest ranked at Expertscape (2). I asked them for help: have I missed some papers? Some sent me to other researchers, some agreed on my thesis. I have had contact with many from Seattle in US to Beijing. It didn´t add data or evidence, but strengthen my thesis and was indeed many interesting discussions.

1. IMMUNE SYSTEM

The human immune system is a very complex process with many tasks, the main is to prevent infection, or limit the impact. There are numerous innate immune cell types in the entire body that have a specific function, and they mostly differentiate within the bone marrow. Continuously new cells are born from stem cells. The immune system is divided in two parts: the innate and the adaptive immune system. The innate is present from birth and is nonspecific, meaning anything that is identified as foreign or non-self is a target for an immune response. The innate immune system can´t distinguish between different bacteria and viruses. The innate immune cells are for example neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages. Everything about the immune system is great described at the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases website 3.

The adaptive immune cells are more specialized with lymphocytes, mainly B-cells and T-cells, that have receptors that identify specific antigens. Antigen (antibody generator) is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune system does not recognize the substance, and trying to get rid of the intruder. There are several different types of T-cells, as helper T-cells (pictured at top in this article) and cytotoxic T-cells (killer cells, CD8+). T-cells are taught in the small organ thymus how to recognize foreign subjects and destroy them, and can only leave the thymus if not reacting to the body´s owns antigens. The lifespan of a T-cell is about seven weeks. Helper T-cells (CD4+) affect the B-cells and tells them to produce antibodies, and they are considered as the immune cells that produce most cytokines. Cytokines are small proteins responsible for signalling in the immune system, for example IL-1, TNF, IL-6, IL-4, IFN and IL-10. Some cytokines are considered as pro inflammatory and some anti-inflammatory (4). A subgroup of T-cells called regulatory T-cells or Treg´s inhibit other T and B-cells to attack the body´s healthy tissue, and destroy some if necessary. This fails sometimes and can lead to different autoimmune diseases. One example is in autoimmune diabetes/type 1 diabetes, when autoreactive T-cells manage to avoid the Tregs and suddenly sees the beta cells as foreign, and kills them (5). The biomarkers for autoimmune diabetes, five different form of autoantibodies (antibodies attack foreign subjects, autoantibodies own healthy tissues), are today believed to have less role in the destruction of the beta cells but the link to the autoimmune process is established. University of Southern California has some easy to understand material as well 6.

 

2. DIABETES AND RISK FOR INFECTIONS, INFLUENZA AND VIRUSES

There are many different forms of diabetes with different etiology, dominated by autoimmune diabetes and type 2 diabetes (5). The immune system might act different due to the fact of the autoimmune reaction occurring in autoimmune diabetes, unfortunately we are lack of separate papers in that sense. Some means that since autoimmune diabetes occur due to a mistake by the immune system who overreact, we have an immune system that is to efficient. It may be but the evidence for that is still weak. There are though some paper that have looked at the immune system in diabetes sine many years, I have read loads of papers but include those I find interesting or that actually add some knowledge. Particular focus at human studies.

Here follows some mixed papers, in fact almost none distinguish between autoimmune diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Please also note that all papers have sources that might be interesting as well, I have read many of them too. Let´s take a look at some systematic review, in general highest in the evidence hierarchy but in this case when we want to see details why an eventual association would occur, that type of study doesn´t answer that question since it just can find correlations. But still important.

A systematic review from 2013 showed a correlation between a severe or complicated influenza and diabetes. Populations at risk for severe or complicated influenza illness: systematic review and meta-analysis. “Conclusion: The evidence supporting risk factors for severe outcomes of influenza ranges from being limited to absent. This was particularly relevant in the relative lack of data for studies on non-2009 H1N1 pandemics and for seasonal influenza. The level of evidence was low for any risk factor, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and neuromuscular disease, and was very low for all other risk factors.” 7

 

A systematic review from 2017, The association between diabetes mellitus and incident infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.” Our study supports the hypothesis that diabetes affects immunity leading to a higher chance of developing multiple types of infections. Indeed, our meta-analysis of adjusted results from both CS and CCS found statistically significant associations among all outcomes. These findings are supported by a large body of pathophysiological evidence across our outcomes of interest. In general, diabetes is known to affect healing, and hyperglycemia affects coagulation, fibrinolytic function, lipid metabolism and endothelial function. Moreover, hyperglycemia decreases function of neutrophils and monocytes by way of impaired chemotaxis, adherence, phagocytosis and other immune system impairment. In addition, people with diabetes are at higher risk of infections with certain microorganisms, mainly Streptococcus (Group A&B Streptococcus) and Staphylococcus.” 8

 

A mini-review from 2010, Diabetes and infection: Is there a link? “Collectively, the data show that there seems to be a tendency for hyperglycemia itself to impair the antibacterial function of neutrophils, while insulin was shown to restore and even enhance the inflammatory response in other trials.” 9

 

Let us look at some other papers I found interesting, mainly observational studies. I focus below mostly at studies that have tried to go deeper than just saying diabetes increase the risk for influenza and similar. I looked for a possible answer, there are studies that have found more intriguing information.

 

A few years ago a paper came with a new theory in type 2 diabetes, about dicarbonyls, performed in a dish in a lab. I have not seen anything after this, but a bit interesting. Modification of β-Defensin-2 by Dicarbonyls Methylglyoxal and Glyoxal Inhibits Antibacterial and Chemotactic Function In Vitro. “What appears to happen, say researchers, is that the high glucose levels associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes unleash destructive molecules that hamper the body’s natural immune defenses that fight infections.” 10

 

1999 and the paper Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes. ”In conclusion, disturbances in cellular innate immunity play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased prevalence of infections in DM patients. In general, a better regulation of the DM leads to an improvement of cellular function. A second important mechanism is the increased adherence of the microorganism to diabetic cells. Furthermore, some microorganisms become more virulent in a high glucose environment.” 11

 

From 2012, Infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of pathogenesis. “Regarding the mononuclear lymphocytes, some studies had demonstrated that when the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is <8.0%, the proliferative function of CD4 T lymphocytes and their response to antigens is not impaired.” 8% in HbA1c in DCCT standard is similar as 64 mmol/mol, see my converter here 12. Further, “In general, infectious diseases are more frequent and/or serious in patients with diabetes mellitus, which potentially increases their morbimortality. The greater frequency of infections in diabetic patients is caused by the hyperglycemic environment that favors immune dysfunction (e.g., damage to the neutrophil function, depression of the antioxidant system, and humoral immunity), micro- and macro-angiopathies, neuropathy, decrease in the antibacterial activity of urine, gastrointestinal and urinary dysmotility, and greater number of medical interventions in these patients. The infections affect all organs and systems.” 13

 

There are some papers that speculate that even short-term hyperglycemia might have impact, even less evidence for this but a bit intriguing, I come back to this later. Here from 2016, The effect of short-term hyperglycemia on the innate immune system .”In summary, acute hyperglycemia can significantly alter innate immune responses to infection, and this potentially explains some of the poor outcomes in hospitalized patients who develop hyperglycemia.” 14

 

A population-based case-control study from 2008, Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and Risk of Hospitalization With Pneumonia, found that “in conclusion, our data, combined with previous results, provide strong evidence that diabetes is associated with a 25–75% increase in the RR of pneumonia-related hospitalization. Longer duration of diabetes and poor glycemic control increase the risk of pneumonia-related hospitalization. These results emphasize the value of influenza and pneumococcal immunization, particularly for patients with longer diabetes duration, and the importance of improved glycemic control to prevent pneumonia-related hospitalization among diabetic patients.” 15

 

A cohort study from UK in 2016, Association between glycaemic control and common infections in people with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study. “Conditions most commonly caused by bacteria, fungi and yeasts were more common in people with worse glycaemic control (pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections and genital and perineal infections). Conditions most commonly of viral origin showed no increased incidence in people with worsening glycaemic control (upper respiratory tract infections, influenza – like illness, intestinal infectious diseases [21,22 ] and herpes simplex).” 16

 

In 2008, a study evaluated eventual differences in type 2 diabetes between hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, Hyperglycemia enhances coagulation and reduces neutrophil degranulation, whereas hyperinsulinemia inhibits fibrinolysis during human endotoxemia. ”In a more controlled setting, the same group applied clamp techniques in healthy volunteers and increased either glucose, insulin, both or none and administered a defined dose of LPS to induce a systemic inflammatory response [30]. After various time points, the inflammatory response and activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis was evaluated. The results demonstrate that hyperglycemia led to more pronounced activation of coagulation while at the same time neutrophil degranulation was diminished. Hyperinsulinemia in turn attenuated fibrinolysis, whereas inflammatory cytokines like TNF or IL-6 did not differ between the groups. The advantage of this latter study is the clear design and low interindividual variability, which possibly gives the best insight into the biological role of glucose and insulin levels during systemic inflammation in humans in vivo.” 17

 

In 2010, a group analysed two studies about pneumonia in diabetes, The influence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus on the host immune response and outcome of pneumonia: analysis of two multicentre cohort studies. “We speculate that acceleration of pre-existing chronic disease may explain higher long-term mortality among those with diabetes. For instance, cardiovascular disease accounted for more than third of all deaths in individuals with diabetes. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease was more common among those with diabetes, which may be further accelerated by the acute infection. Early recognition or better management of atherosclerotic heart disease and concomitant risk factors, such as smoking and hyperlipidaemia, may improve outcomes. We showed that diabetes was associated with higher risk of acute kidney injury, which was associated with higher risk of 1-year mortality in our study and previous studies. Acute kidney injury itself or its sequela, CKD, may lead to death by several mechanisms, including increased risk of cardiovascular disease and infections.” 18

 

 

In 1999 a paper found that better regulated diabetes improved cellular functions associated with the immune system, Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). “In conclusion, disturbances in cellular innate immunity play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased prevalence of infections in DM patients. In general, a better regulation of the DM leads to an improvement of cellular function. A second important mechanism is the increased adherence of the microorganism to diabetic cells. Furthermore, some microorganisms become more virulent in a high glucose environment.” 19

 

A study from 2019, Relationship between natural killer cell activity and glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes: “Compared with individuals with normal glucose tolerance or prediabetes, type 2 diabetes patients have a reduced NK cell activity, and it is significantly related to glucose control.” 20

 

Perhaps the most interesting study in this field is the newest as well, published in Nature 2019. High Glucose Environments Interfere with Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophage Inflammatory Mediator Release, the TLR4 Pathway and Glucose Metabolism. “Hyperglycaemia appears to impair the immune response and the clearance of pathogens by macrophages in diabetic subjects. A lack of glucose homeostasis can be an important key to macrophage deregulation in a hyperglycaemic environment under a variety of stimuli. Due to the high susceptibility to infections and elevated risk of developing complications after surgery in diabetic patients, failures in inflammation resolution contribute to the high rates of morbidity and mortality in diabetic subjects.” From the conclusion: “The effects of high glucose on macrophages have been shown to be primarily due to high glucose itself. Hyperglycaemia disrupts many cellular functions, and the “legacy effect” triggered by uncontrolled glycaemia may be associated with a short or long period of high glucose exposure. It is possible that diabetic BMDMs cannot overcome high glucose to maintain regular inflammatory functions, promoting the establishment of “glycaemic memory”. In addition, it appears that non-diabetic BMDMs are more resistant to changes triggered by persistent high glucose than diabetic BMDMs, and a long exposure time is necessary to promote substantial changes in the levels of cytokine release.” 21

 

3. WHAT ELSE CAN WEAKEN THE IMMUNE SYSTEM?

It´s well established that aging can weaken the immune system, of course heterogeneous as well. It´s called immunosenesescence and refers to changes in the immune system that might increase the susceptibility for diseases. There are many papers in this area, Science Direct has a category here for those who might be interested to read more 22.

A number of factors are well-known that they can negatively affect your immune system. Please note that there are no magic shortcuts, even though many claims so. A popular scientific article from Harvard 2014 summarize it in a simple manner, which should be interpreted what is rather normal, general advices for public health (23):

 

  • Don’t smoke.
  • Eat a diet high in fruits and vegetables.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Get adequate sleep.
  • Take steps to avoid infection, such as washing your hands frequently and cooking meats thoroughly.
  • Try to minimize stress.

 

Easier said than done of course. A paper from 2006 in Diabetes Care touched this topic and comorbidity, The impact of comorbid chronic conditions on diabetes care. It might lead to a sort of catch 22 scenario, if getting more chronic diseases the burden and the physiological impact can be huge, which in turn can worsen some diseases or the health in general: 24

 

There are some studies that have looked into the impact of comorbidity having diabetes and MERS, another coronavirus discovered in 2012. In mice though, but “These data suggest that the increased disease severity observed in individuals with MERS and comorbid type 2 diabetes is likely due to a dysregulated immune response, which results in more severe and prolonged lung pathology.” 25

 

Another paper from 2019 about comorbidity and type 2 diabetes, particular tuberculosis, summarized “Uncontrolled T2DM can lead to alterations in the immune system, increasing the risk of susceptibility to infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Altered immune responses could be attributed to factors such as the elevated glucose concentration, leading to the production of Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) and the constant inflammation, associated with T2DM.” 26

 

If having autoimmune diabetes there seems to be increased risk for at least some other autoimmune conditions. About 80 autoimmune diseases are known today 27. In Sweden and the international TEDDY study, about 10% of all children diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes within five years develop celiac disease as well (28). The researchers don´t know why and it doesn´t imply there is a link between the diseases, it can be due to the similar environmental factors. We also knows some autoimmune diseases share some risk genes as well. A study in USA from T1D Exchange in 2016 showed that 27% of those diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes was affected with at least one additional autoimmune disease as well. Most common was autoimmune thyroiditis with 24% (29). How that might impact the immune response to viruses, influenza and infections is not studied.

 

4. NOT TO FORGET – OTHER POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTIONS

On top of all this is another very important topic. All of us that has diabetes are more than aware of that having an infection, virus or influenza affect our stress hormones and cause a higher insulin need, more swings and often higher values. Some ends up at a hospital with a ketoacidosis (30) and it can be fatal. It´s natural defence from the body to fight off the unwelcome intruder, releasing stress hormones that are the number 1 diabetes antagonists. In humans, the natural endocrine and immunological responses to stress ensure adequate availability of glucose by activating gluconeogenesis and by reducing the sensitivity to insulin for those organs and tissues that predominantly rely upon glucose as metabolic substrate, such as the brain and blood cells. Gluconeogenesis is a process in the liver where glucose is made from protein (particular alanin) and the glycerol part in fat. Both epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) stimulate gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis (release of stored glycogen in the liver), norepinephrine has the added effect of increasing the supply of glycerol to the liver via lipolysis. Interestingly, inflammatory mediators, specifically the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and C-reactive protein, also induce peripheral insulin resistance. Cortisol affect the glucose level through the activation of key enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and inhibition of glucose uptake in tissues such as the skeletal muscles. Growth hormone can reduce the insulin sensitivity as well and adrenaline stimulates glucagon release which affect the glycogenolysis. This means that adrenaline affect the liver to release glucose in two ways.

 

In diabetes this is naturally challenging of course, and a major issue often when having a flu, virus or infection. To manage the disease if being more ill is indeed very tough, and if not being able to do it due to critical illness that can worsen the outcome through hyperglycemia and ketones, leading to an ketoacidosis. This can naturally be a challenge ending up at a hospital of another reason than diabetes, important to ensure people close to us are at least aware of that we do have the disease (3132333435)

 

5. VACCINES

Everything so far is the reason that people with diabetes are recommended to take vaccines for influenza and anything that is possible. Diabetes is considered a risk group in that case, personally I would say the reason in the past was rather that researchers saw a correlation with risk for, and severity, of, influenza, viruses and infections. Today, it´s more about the part in chapter 4. Anecdotal I never get sick and it has been the reality whole my life, but I take the flu vaccine just to increase my chances to avoid the influenza since it might give a roller coaster glucose for some days, and worsen my condition.

 

Vaccines are safe, the association with autoimmune diabetes has been researched extensively since people saw a correlation with the increase of evidence of autoimmune diabetes in the beginning of the eighties and the MMR vaccine. There are also some reviews and meta-analysis, here a quite new review from Sweden in 2019, Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes, said “There has been speculation that vaccines might trigger autoimmunity, but no association has been detected with islet autoimmunity or type 1 diabetes. A recent meta-analysis of 23 studies investigating 16 vaccinations concluded that childhood vaccines do not increase the risk of type 1 diabetes”. 36. The meta-analysis they refer to is Vaccinations and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of observational studies: “Meta-analyses found no significant association between any of the 11 vaccinations and the risk of type 1 diabetes. Conclusion: This study found no evidence that any of the reported vaccinations were associated with the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. These findings were little altered after adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Results were also largely unchanged after two sensitivity analyses investigating the effect of study design and quality assessment score were conducted.” 37

Huge and international ongoing TEDDY-study, who as a different to almost all studies are looking on everything that happens before eventual autoantibodies appears, in fact life. Most other studies try to find a causal link after diagnose, this is a very important difference. They looked at Pandemrix, not MMR, but interesting was that the Finnish children (Finland has absolute highest incidence of autoimmune diabetes since many years) showed a protection to develop autoantibodies if they have had Pandemrix, not conclusive yet though 38

As long as we don’t know all we must be humble, but as for vaccine no causal link to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In fact vaccines are now tested as prevention, the most interesting is a vaccine targeting the Coxsackievirus, slightly delayed and expected to start later in 2020 one of the project leaders, Professor Mikael Knip from Finland, told me 39. Virus is not the sole cause of autoimmune diabetes but the evidence is getting stronger continuously that it has some role. TEDDY showed this recently as well 40.

 

6. SUMMARY

Taking all together, diabetes can of course not be lumped together as one individual. All evidence point in the direction that if it is an increased risk for viruses, infections and influenza in diabetes it´s because of hyperglycemia over time, expressed as a higher HbA1c, and that comorbidity have a role too. The questions are rather: when do the risk eventually increase if HbA1c alone really is enough? What impact has duration of diabetes in this, particular in people who were diagnosed long ago when the chances were very different?

We already knew enough to do what we can do reduce the HbA1c and other parameters we measures. Particular since more or less all complications associated to diabetes, both autoimmune diabetes and type 2, are due to higher glucose over time, even though genetics might play a minor role too. The risk for viruses, influenza and infections are yet another reason. But if you want to state that “people with diabetes are at risk” as if 425 million people with diabetes globally (1) were one individual it´s not science, and the evidence we do have shows that if any risk at all, it´s rather linked to higher HbA1c over time and more probably, comorbidity.

 

7. WHAT IS THE TAKE HOME MESSAGE?

People with diabetes are not per se immunocompromised, nor have a dysregulated or weakened immune system. Ask for evidence. Important is to avoid being to black and white – as well as many people with diabetes don´t are at higher risk for viruses, influenza and infections we know some are, and we might know some of these people too. People with diabetes are often questioning the blaming of being a “bad diabetic” and prejudices from those who don´t understand. If anyone should ensure we stop the stigmatization we must start within the world of diabetes. Diabetes is tough, people are different and possibilities too – it´s life.

 

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/
  2. http://expertscape.com/ex/diabetes+mellitus%2C+type+1
  3. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-response-features
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nri1257
  5. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  6. https://dtc.ucsf.edu/types-of-diabetes/type1/understanding-type-1-diabetes/autoimmunity/what-is-the-immune-system/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3805492/
  8. https://drc.bmj.com/content/5/1/e000336
  9. https://www.karger.com/Article/Fulltext/345107
  10. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130533
  11. https://academic.oup.com/femspd/article/26/3-4/259/638202
  12. http://www.diabethics.com/hba1c-converter/
  13. http://www.ijem.in/article.asp?issn=2230-8210;year=2012;volume=16;issue=7;spage=27;epage=36;aulast=Casqueiro;type=3
  14. https://www.amjmedsci.org/article/S0002-9629(15)00027-0/fulltext
  15. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/31/8/1541.long
  16. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dme.13205
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2435690/
  18. https://thorax.bmj.com/content/65/10/870.long
  19. https://academic.oup.com/femspd/article/26/3-4/259/638202
  20. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdi.13002
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-47836-8
  22. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/immunosenescence
  23. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-boost-your-immune-system
  24. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/29/3/725
  25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824443/
  26. https://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/8/12/2219/htm
  27. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897964/
  29. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/101/12/4931/2765078#sthash.O0dqagwM.dpuf
  30. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  31. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3672537/
  32. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/99/5/1569/2537306
  33. https://stke.sciencemag.org/content/5/247/pt10.long
  34. https://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/18/2/121
  35. https://academic.oup.com/edrv/article/30/2/152/2355062
  36. http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC5571740/
  37. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4705121/
  38. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4448-3
  39. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  40. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/

 

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer and lecturer
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 


 

Har personer med diabetes ett nedsatt immunförsvar eller är det en myt?

Vi med diabetes har i minst 35 år fått höra att vi oavsett form av diabetes är mer mottagliga för infektioner, virus och influensa. Jag har personligen läst enormt många studier som statuerar detta, i princip uteslutande epidemiologiska studier dock som tittat på en stor grupp människor. För mig är detta inget slutgiltigt svar, bara en påminnelse att kanske det är så för en del. Frågan är dock, skall vi verkligen titta på 425 miljoner personer med diabetes i världen som en homogen grupp? (1) Naturligtvis inte. Men då det ändå uppenbarligen finns någon korrelation mellan diabetes och virus, infektioner och influensa, vad kan möjligen vara orsaken? Senaste tre veckorna har jag ägnat väldigt mycket tid att finna ett svar på denna fråga. Evidensen som finns pekar tydligt på ett möjligt samband: hyperglykemi över tid, uttryckt som högt HbA1c, och samsjuklighet. Frågorna som återstår att bli besvarade är dock om ett förhöjt HbA1c är tillräckligt för att försämra immunförsvaret? Om så, när kan detta möjligen tänkas ske? Eller, är det snarare samsjuklighet som är problemet, som i sig ofta kan bero på just förhöjt HbA1c över tid? Vad har lång diabetesduration för eventuell betydelse, diskonterat hur förutsättningarna var förr i tiden kontra idag?

För att skriva denna artikel så gjorde jag något jag inte normalt gör. Jag har kontinuerlig kontakt med väldigt många forskare inom diabetes runt jordklotet, flera av dem tillhör de högst rankade i världen på Expertscape (2). Jag frågade dem om hjälp, har jag verkligen missat något? Några gav mig tips på andra att rådfråga, de flesta bekräftade min tes. Jag har haft kontakt med forskare från Seattle till Peking, det adderade inte något i form av evidens men bekräftade min tes och det var likt alltid väldigt givande diskussioner.

 

 

1. IMMUNFÖRSVAR

Immunförsvaret hos människor är ett väldigt komplext system med många uppgifter, den huvudsakliga uppgiften är att förhindra infektion eller minimera effekten. Det finns flera medfödda immunceller i människokroppen, som alla har en specifik uppgift, och samtliga har sitt ursprung i benmärgen. Nya celler uppstår kontinuerligt, från stamceller. Immunförsvaret är uppdelat i främst två delar: det medfödda och det adaptiva. Det medfödda immunförsvaret föds vi således med och detta är ospecifikt, vilket betyder att allting som identifieras som en inkräktare eller icke kroppseget ger upphov till ett immunsvar. Det medfödda immunförsvaret kan inte heller skilja mellan olika bakterier eller virus. De medfödda immuncellerna är exempelvis neutrofila leukocyter, eosinofila leukocyter, basofiler, mastceller, monocyter, dendritiska celler och makrofager. Allt om immunförsvaret är väldigt fint beskrivet på amerikanska myndigheten National Institute of Allery and Infectious Diseases hemsida 3.

Det adaptiva immunförsvaret är mer specialiserat med lymfocyter, huvudsakligen B- och T-celler, som har receptorer som identifierar specifika antigen. Antigen (av antibody generator) är vilket ämne som helst som gör att immunförsvaret producerar antikroppar mot det. Det innebär att immunförsvaret inte känner igen substansen eller ämnet och försöker bli av med det. Det finns flera olika typer av T-celler, som T-hjälparceller (på toppbilden i denna artikel) och cytotoxiska T-celler (mördarceller, CD8+). T-celler lärs upp i det lilla organet brässen (thymus), hur de ska känna igen okända ämnen och förstöra dem, och får endast lämna brässen under förutsättning att de inte reagerar med kroppens egna antigen. Livslängden på en T-cell är ungefär sju veckor. T-hjälparceller (CD4+) påverkar B-cellerna och förmår dem att producera antikroppar, de anses också vara de som producerar mest cytokiner. Cytokiner är små proteiner som fungerar som signalmolekyler i immunförsvaret, exempelvis IL-1, TNF, IL-6, IL-4, IFN och IL-10.  Vissa ses som proinflammatoriska och vissa anti-inflammatoriska (4). En subgrupp av T-celler kallas regulatoriska T-celler eller Tregs och dessa förhindrar andra T- och B-celler att angripa frisk kroppsvävnad, och förstör dem om nödvändigt. Ibland felar detta och det kan leda till att en autoimmun sjukdom uppstår. Ett exempel är autoimmun diabetes/typ 1 diabetes, där autoreaktiva T-celler lyckas undkomma Tregs och plötsligt ser betacellerna som inkräktare, och förstör dem (5). Biomarkörer för autoimmun diabetes, fem olika typer av autoantikroppar (observera, antikroppar angriper främmande ämnen, autoantikroppar frisk kroppsvävnad), tros idag ha mindre betydande roll i själva destruktionen av betaceller men kopplingen till förloppet för autoimmun diabetes är väletablerat. University of Southern California hare n del lättförståeligt material likväl 6.

 

 

2. DIABETES OCH RISK FÖR INFEKTIONER, INFLUENSA OCH VIRUS

Det finns flera olika former av diabetes med olika etiologi, som domineras av formerna autoimmun diabetes och typ 2 diabetes (5). Immunförsvaret kan agera något annorlunda diskonterat den autoimmuna reaktion som sker vid autoimmun diabetes, tyvärr saknas det onekligen publicera studier som tydligt separerar detta. Vissa menar emellanåt att då autoimmun diabetes uppstår efter ett misstag av immunförsvaret som överreagerar, så skulle vi ha ett immunförsvar som egentligen är överaktivt. Möjligt, evidensen för detta är svag dock. Däremot finns väldigt många studier som tittat på immunförsvaret vid diabetes, sedan många år. Jag har läst väldigt många men nedan inkluderar jag ett urval av de jag ser som mer intressanta. Särskilt fokus på humanstudier.

 

Här kommer lite mixat med studier, i själva verket så skiljer i princip ingen mellan autoimmun diabetes och typ 2 diabetes, synd. Om ni har lust att läsa referenserna så rekommenderar jag även att från dessa klicka er vidare, där finns mycket intressant likväl. Låt mig först visa ett par systematiska översiktsstudier, i praktiken överst i evidenshierarkin men här vill jag alltså gå djupare, förbi detta och inte endast se ett samband utan i sådana fall varför ett samband, en korrelation, finns. Den typen av studier kan inte besvara den frågan, dock fortsatt intressant.

 

En systematisk översiktsstudie från 2013 visar en korrelation mellan allvarlig eller komplicerad influensa och diabetes. Populations at risk for severe or complicated influenza illness: systematic review and meta-analysis. Conclusion: “The evidence supporting risk factors for severe outcomes of influenza ranges from being limited to absent. This was particularly relevant in the relative lack of data for studies on non-2009 H1N1 pandemics and for seasonal influenza. The level of evidence was low for any risk factor, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and neuromuscular disease, and was very low for all other risk factors.” 7

 

En annan systematisk översiktsstudie från 2017, The association between diabetes mellitus and incident infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.” Our study supports the hypothesis that diabetes affects immunity leading to a higher chance of developing multiple types of infections. Indeed, our meta-analysis of adjusted results from both CS and CCS found statistically significant associations among all outcomes. These findings are supported by a large body of pathophysiological evidence across our outcomes of interest. In general, diabetes is known to affect healing, and hyperglycemia affects coagulation, fibrinolytic function, lipid metabolism and endothelial function. Moreover, hyperglycemia decreases function of neutrophils and monocytes by way of impaired chemotaxis, adherence, phagocytosis and other immune system impairment. In addition, people with diabetes are at higher risk of infections with certain microorganisms, mainly Streptococcus (Group A&B Streptococcus) and Staphylococcus.” 8

 

2010 kom en mini-review, Diabetes and infection: Is there a link? “Collectively, the data show that there seems to be a tendency for hyperglycemia itself to impair the antibacterial function of neutrophils, while insulin was shown to restore and even enhance the inflammatory response in other trials.” 9

 

Låt mig istället gå vidare och visa studier som är mer intressanta, mestadels observationsstudier. Jag fokuserar nedan på de som faktiskt försökt svara på frågan istället för att bara statuera ett eventuellt samband mellan diabetes och risk för influensa och liknande. Jag sökte efter en möjlig förklaring, det finns studier som har funnit mer spännande svar.

 

För ett par år sedan kom en ny förklaringsmodell gällande typ 2 diabetes, om dikarbonyler, utfört i en skål i ett labb. Jag har tyvärr inte sett något om detta senare, men ändå lite småintressant. Modification of β-Defensin-2 by Dicarbonyls Methylglyoxal and Glyoxal Inhibits Antibacterial and Chemotactic Function In Vitro. “What appears to happen, say researchers, is that the high glucose levels associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes unleash destructive molecules that hamper the body’s natural immune defenses that fight infections.” 10

 

1999 kom studien Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes. ”In conclusion, disturbances in cellular innate immunity play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased prevalence of infections in DM patients. In general, a better regulation of the DM leads to an improvement of cellular function. A second important mechanism is the increased adherence of the microorganism to diabetic cells. Furthermore, some microorganisms become more virulent in a high glucose environment.” 11

 

 

Från 2012, Infections in patients with diabetes mellitus: A review of pathogenesis. “Regarding the mononuclear lymphocytes, some studies had demonstrated that when the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is <8.0%, the proliferative function of CD4 T lymphocytes and their response to antigens is not impaired.” 8% i HbA1c i amerikansk DCCT-standard motsvarar 64 mmol/mol, se min konverterare här 12. Vidare, “In general, infectious diseases are more frequent and/or serious in patients with diabetes mellitus, which potentially increases their morbimortality. The greater frequency of infections in diabetic patients is caused by the hyperglycemic environment that favors immune dysfunction (e.g., damage to the neutrophil function, depression of the antioxidant system, and humoral immunity), micro- and macro-angiopathies, neuropathy, decrease in the antibacterial activity of urine, gastrointestinal and urinary dysmotility, and greater number of medical interventions in these patients. The infections affect all organs and systems.” 13

 

Det finns ett fåtal studier som spekulerar i om även kortvarig hyperglykemi skulle kunna spela in, evidensen är svag men intressant, återkommer till det senare. Här från 2016, The effect of short-term hyperglycemia on the innate immune system .”In summary, acute hyperglycemia can significantly alter innate immune responses to infection, and this potentially explains some of the poor outcomes in hospitalized patients who develop hyperglycemia.” 14

 

En fallkontrollstudie på en större population från 2008, Diabetes, Glycemic Control, and Risk of Hospitalization With Pneumonia, fann att “in conclusion, our data, combined with previous results, provide strong evidence that diabetes is associated with a 25–75% increase in the RR of pneumonia-related hospitalization. Longer duration of diabetes and poor glycemic control increase the risk of pneumonia-related hospitalization. These results emphasize the value of influenza and pneumococcal immunization, particularly for patients with longer diabetes duration, and the importance of improved glycemic control to prevent pneumonia-related hospitalization among diabetic patients.” 15

 

 

En kohortstudie från UK 2016, Association between glycaemic control and common infections in people with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study. “Conditions most commonly caused by bacteria, fungi and yeasts were more common in people with worse glycaemic control (pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infections, urinary tract infections and genital and perineal infections). Conditions most commonly of viral origin showed no increased incidence in people with worsening glycaemic control (upper respiratory tract infections, influenza – like illness, intestinal infectious diseases [21,22 ] and herpes simplex).” 16

 

2008 tittade en grupp forskare på eventuella skillnader på hyperglykemi och hyperinsulinemi vid typ 2 diabetes, Hyperglycemia enhances coagulation and reduces neutrophil degranulation, whereas hyperinsulinemia inhibits fibrinolysis during human endotoxemia. ”In a more controlled setting, the same group applied clamp techniques in healthy volunteers and increased either glucose, insulin, both or none and administered a defined dose of LPS to induce a systemic inflammatory response [30]. After various time points, the inflammatory response and activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis was evaluated. The results demonstrate that hyperglycemia led to more pronounced activation of coagulation while at the same time neutrophil degranulation was diminished. Hyperinsulinemia in turn attenuated fibrinolysis, whereas inflammatory cytokines like TNF or IL-6 did not differ between the groups. The advantage of this latter study is the clear design and low interindividual variability, which possibly gives the best insight into the biological role of glucose and insulin levels during systemic inflammation in humans in vivo.” 17

 

 

2010 analyserade en grupp forskare två studier som tittat på lunginflammation vid diabetes, The influence of pre-existing diabetes mellitus on the host immune response and outcome of pneumonia: analysis of two multicentre cohort studies. “We speculate that acceleration of pre-existing chronic disease may explain higher long-term mortality among those with diabetes. For instance, cardiovascular disease accounted for more than third of all deaths in individuals with diabetes. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease was more common among those with diabetes, which may be further accelerated by the acute infection. Early recognition or better management of atherosclerotic heart disease and concomitant risk factors, such as smoking and hyperlipidaemia, may improve outcomes. We showed that diabetes was associated with higher risk of acute kidney injury, which was associated with higher risk of 1-year mortality in our study and previous studies. Acute kidney injury itself or its sequela, CKD, may lead to death by several mechanisms, including increased risk of cardiovascular disease and infections.” 18

 

 

1999 fann en forskargrupp att bättre reglerad diabetes förbättrade funktionerna hos celler förknippade med immunförsvaret, Immune dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). “In conclusion, disturbances in cellular innate immunity play a role in the pathogenesis of the increased prevalence of infections in DM patients. In general, a better regulation of the DM leads to an improvement of cellular function. A second important mechanism is the increased adherence of the microorganism to diabetic cells. Furthermore, some microorganisms become more virulent in a high glucose environment.” 19

 

En studie från 2019, Relationship between natural killer cell activity and glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. “Compared with individuals with normal glucose tolerance or prediabetes, type 2 diabetes patients have a reduced NK cell activity, and it is significantly related to glucose control.” 20

 

Av den stora manga studier jag plöjt sista tre veckorna är kanske den mest intressanta en av de färskaste, publicerad i Nature 2019. High Glucose Environments Interfere with Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophage Inflammatory Mediator Release, the TLR4 Pathway and Glucose Metabolism. “Hyperglycaemia appears to impair the immune response and the clearance of pathogens by macrophages in diabetic subjects. A lack of glucose homeostasis can be an important key to macrophage deregulation in a hyperglycaemic environment under a variety of stimuli. Due to the high susceptibility to infections and elevated risk of developing complications after surgery in diabetic patients, failures in inflammation resolution contribute to the high rates of morbidity and mortality in diabetic subjects.” Här från studiens sammanfattning: “The effects of high glucose on macrophages have been shown to be primarily due to high glucose itself. Hyperglycaemia disrupts many cellular functions, and the “legacy effect” triggered by uncontrolled glycaemia may be associated with a short or long period of high glucose exposure. It is possible that diabetic BMDMs cannot overcome high glucose to maintain regular inflammatory functions, promoting the establishment of “glycaemic memory”. In addition, it appears that non-diabetic BMDMs are more resistant to changes triggered by persistent high glucose than diabetic BMDMs, and a long exposure time is necessary to promote substantial changes in the levels of cytokine release.” 21

 

3. VAD MER KAN FÖRSVAGA IMMUNFÖRSVARET?

Det är väletablerat att immunförsvaret kan försvagas med åldern, naturligtvis olika även det. Finns faktiskt ett uttryck för detta på engelska, immunosenesescence, och det avses alltså förändringar I immunförsvaret som kan öka risken för mottagligheten att drabbas av sjukdomar. Finns många artiklar i ämnet, Science Direct har en hel kategori där de samlat allt, för de intresserade att läsa mer 22.

 

Flera faktorer är väl kända att kunna negativt påverka immunförsvaret. Vänligen observera att det inte finns några genvägar, även om många hävdar detta. En populärvetenskaplig artikel från Harvard från 2014 summerar det på ett enkelt sätt, och den skall snarare utläsas som att detta är de normala råden för befolkningen i stort gällande folkhälsa och vad man bör göra för att förbättra chanserna till ett bra immunförsvar (23):

 

  • Rök inte
  • Ät en diet med mycket grönsaker och frukt.
  • Motionera regelbundet.
  • Eftersträva en normal vikt.
  • Om du dricker alkohol, gör det med måtta.
  • Se till att sova ordentligt.
  • Försök med små åtgärder undvika infektioner, såsom att tvätta händerna ofta och genomstek maten.
  • Minimera stress.

 

Allt lättare sagt än gjort, förstås. En studie från 2006 och Diabetes Care handlade om utmaningarna med detta och samsjuklighet, The impact of comorbid chronic conditions on diabetes care. Det kan bli lite av ett moment-22 scenario, drabbas man av fler kroniska sjukdomar så blir bördan större och den psykologiska påverkan kan bli mycket stor, vilket i sin tur kan förvärra de etablerade fysiska sjukdomarna, 24.

 

Det finns även studier som tittat på detta med samsjuklighet vid diabetes och MERS, ett annat coronavirus som upptäcktes 2012. Dock utförd på möss, men “These data suggest that the increased disease severity observed in individuals with MERS and comorbid type 2 diabetes is likely due to a dysregulated immune response, which results in more severe and prolonged lung pathology.” 25

 

En annan studie från 2019 som handlar om typ 2 diabetes och samsjuklighet, särskilt tuberkulos, summerade “Uncontrolled T2DM can lead to alterations in the immune system, increasing the risk of susceptibility to infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). Altered immune responses could be attributed to factors such as the elevated glucose concentration, leading to the production of Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) and the constant inflammation, associated with T2DM.” 26

 

Har man autoimmune diabetes verkar risken för att drabbas av åtminstone vissa andra autoimmuna sjukdomar. Ungefär 80 andra autoimmuna sjukdomar är kända idag 27. I Sverige och den internationella TEDDY-studien så har ca 10% av alla barn som drabbats av autoimmun diabetes inom fem år även fått celiaki (28). Man vet inte varför och det måste inte betyda i ett samband mellan sjukdomarna, utan de kan bottna i samma miljöfaktorer. Vi vet dessutom att sjukdomarna delar viss genetisk risk. En studie från T1D Exchange i USA 2016 visade att 27% av de som diagnostiseras med autoimmun diabetes har minst en till autoimmun sjukdom. Vanligast var autoimmun tyreoidit, eller Hashimotos, med 24% (29). Hur det eventuellt kan påverka immunförsvarets respons mot virus, infektioner och influensa är inte studerat.

 

 

4. ICKE ATT FÖRGLÖMMA- ANDRA FAKTORER

På toppen av allt hittills finns ytterligare en viktig faktor. Alla vi som själva har diabetes är väl medveten om att får vi ett virus, infektion eller influensa så gör våra stresshormoner att vårt insulinbehov stiger, vi får lätt mer fluktuationer och lite högre värden. En del drabbas av höga ketoner och en del hamnar tyvärr på sjukhus med en ketoacidos som kan vara dödlig, (30). Idag är detta något lättare att hantera för oss som i Sverige har autoimmun diabetes, eftersom nästan alla har sensorbaserad glukosmätning och inte kan preventivt undvika detta men hänga med någorlunda (31). Vad som sker i kroppen vid en infektion, virus eller influensa är välstuderat sedan länge. Stressreaktionen är kroppens naturliga försvar för att mota den ovälkomna gästen, och stresshormoner frisätts som är absoluta nr 1 av diabetesantagonister. Hos människor säkerställer denna endokrina och immunologiska reaktion adekvat tillgång på glukos genom att stimulera glukoneogenes i levern och sänka insulinkänsligheten för de organ och vävnader som är mer beroende av glukos som energi, som exempelvis hjärnan och de röda blodkropparna. Glukoneogenes är en process i levern där glukos tillverkas från protein (främst alanin) och i viss mån även glyceroldelen i fett. Både adrenalin och noradrenalin stimulerar glukoneogenes och glykogenolys (nedbrytning och frisättning av lagrat leverglykogen som blir till glukos i kroppen), noradrenalin har även tilläggseffekten att öka tillgången på glycerol till levern genom lipolys (nedbrytning av fett). Intressant nog, vissa inflammationsmarkörer och speciellt cytokinerna TNF, IL-1, IL-6, och C-reaktivt protein, bidrar även till att sänka insulinkänsligheten i främst muskler. Kortisol, ett annat stresshormon, påverkar glukosnivån genom att aktivera viktiga enzymer som är involverad i glukoneogenesen och hämmande av glukosupptag i exempelvis skelettmuskulatur. Tillväxthormon kan även det sänka insulinkänsligheten, och adrenalin stimulerar glucakonfrisättning vilket påverkar glykogenolys. Det här innebär alltså att adrenalin på två sätt påverkar levern att frisätta lagrat glykogen, som alltså blir glukos.

Vid diabetes är allt ovan en stor utmaning, och kan bli problematiskt om man drabbas av ett virus, infektion eller influensa. Att hantera sjukdomen diabetes om man är sjuk är onekligen tufft, och är man kritiskt sjuk och inte alls kan ta hand om den själv kan situationen försämras ytterligare genom hyperglykemi, höga ketoner och en ketoacidos. Det här är naturligtvis även ytterligare problematiskt om man hamnar på sjukhus av andra skäl än sin diabetes, en anledning ytterligare att informera sin omgivning och nära och kära lite om sin sjukdom (3233343536).

 

 

5. VACCIN

Mycket av det ni läst hittills är skälet till att personer med diabetes rekommenderas att vaccinera för influensa och allt i övrigt möjligt. Diabetes ses som en riskgrupp, personligen menar jag att skälet till att personer med diabetes sågs som en riskgrupp för var annan och mer då att man såg en korrelation mellan diabetes och risk för influensa, virus och infektioner, kom ihåg att förutsättningarna var sämre och HbA1c över en population högre. Därför var många fler i riskgruppen. Idag handlar det mer om delen ovan i kapitel 4. Helt anekdotiskt så blir jag sällan sjuk och det har alltid varit så, men jag tar influensavaccin för att minska risken att bli sjuk då det blir lite jobbigt att hantera sin diabetes ett par dagar med svängande blodsocker, då man kanske dessutom inte är så mentalt skärpt.

 

Vaccin är säkra och välstuderade, sambandet med utvecklandet av autoimmun diabetes har studerats väldigt mycket efter att man såg en korrelation mellan ökning av incidensen av autoimmun diabetes och MPR-vaccin för ca 35 år sedan. Det finns flera översiktsartiklar och meta-analyser, här en lite nyare från Sverige från 2019, Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes, ”There has been speculation that vaccines might trigger autoimmunity, but no association has been detected with islet autoimmunity or type 1 diabetes. A recent meta-analysis of 23 studies investigating 16 vaccinations concluded that childhood vaccines do not increase the risk of type 1 diabetes”. 37. Meta-analysen som hänvisas till är Vaccinations and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of observational studies, “Meta-analyses found no significant association between any of the 11 vaccinations and the risk of type 1 diabetes. Conclusion: This study found no evidence that any of the reported vaccinations were associated with the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. These findings were little altered after adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Results were also largely unchanged after two sensitivity analyses investigating the effect of study design and quality assessment score were conducted.” 38

Intressant från den stora TEDDY-studien, som till skillnad från närmast alla studier tittar vad som sker innan autoantikroppar uppstår, det vill säga långt innan diagnos, i själva verket tittar på allt som sker i livet. De flesta studier i ämnet försöker se ett mönster och hitta korrelationer efter diagnos, det är omöjligt att veta vad som skett ibland i många år innan diagnos, en väsentlig skillnad mot TEDDY. De tittade på effekten av Pandemrix, inte MPR med andra ord, men väldigt intressant var att de finska barnen (Finland har överlägset högst incidens i världen av autoimmun diabetes hos barn, sedan många år) visade sig ha ett skydd mot att utveckla autoantikroppar om de fått Pandemrix, dock inget slutgiltigt svar ännu, 39.

 

Så länge vi inte vet allt om utvecklingen av autoimmun diabetes och vad som orsakar sjukdomen måste vi förhålla oss ödmjuka, men gällande vaccin anser jag att vi kan avskriva det som eventuellt bidragande. I själva verket testas nu vaccin som prevention, det mest intressanta riktar sig mot coxsackievirus, det virus med starkast evidens att kunna bidra till utvecklandet av autoimmun diabetes. Det projektet berättade professor Mikael Knip, en av de bakom detta försök, nyligen för mig var något försenat men beräknas startas under senare delen av 2020. 40. Virus är inte den enskilda orsaken till utvecklingen av autoimmun diabetes men evidensen stärks löpande för att det har någon roll, TEDDY visade detta nyligen också 41.

 

 

 

6. SUMMERING

Allt sammantaget, diabetes kan naturligtvis inte klumpas ihop till en enskild individ. All samlad evidens pekar dock mot att om någon ökad risk för influensa, infektioner och virus vid diabetes så bottnar det i hyperglykemi över tid, uttryckt som förhöjt HbA1c, och att samsjuklighet har en roll likväl. Frågorna är snarare: om HbA1c räcker för att på något sätt försvaga immunförsvaret, vid ungefär vilken nivå sker det? Sedan det viktiga, vad har diabetesduration för betydelse här, det vill säga hur länge man haft sjukdomen, i synnerhet för de med lång duration som haft sjukdomen då förutsättningarna var mycket sämre?

 

Vi visste redan tillräckligt för att arbeta hårt för att nå bra målvärden på det vi följs upp på. I synnerhet eftersom i princip alla komplikationer som vi kan drabbas av har ett samband med främst höga glukosvärden över tid, både för autoimmun diabetes och typ 2 diabetes, även om genetiken möjligen kan ha en mindre betydelse. Risken för virus, influensa och infektioner är ytterligare ett skäl till att arbeta hårt. Men om man vill statuera att ”personer med diabetes har ökad risk” som att vi 425 miljoner människor med diabetes globalt (1) vore en individ så är det inte vetenskap, och evidensen som vi de facto har visar att om någon risk alls, så korrelerar det med högt HbA1c över tid och troligen, säger jag, samsjuklighet.

 

 

 

7. VAD ÄR DET VIKTIGASTE ATT TA MED SIG FRÅN ALLT DETTA?

Personer med diabetes har inte per se ett nedsatt immunförsvar. Fråga efter evidens. Viktigt här är naturligtvis att inte vara svartvitt – likväl som många med diabetes inte löper högre risk att drabbas av virus, influensa och infektioner så vet vi att vissa tyvärr kanske gör det, och vi kanske även känner någon i den kategorin. Många personer med diabetes vänder sig ofta mot uttrycket från de utan insyn i diabetes som talar om ”en dålig diabetiker” och andra fördomar. Om någon ska bidra till att motverka stigmatiseringen så är det vi själva inom diabetesvärlden. Diabetes är en tuff sjukdom, människor är olika och förutsättningarna likaså – livet.

 

 

Jag tackar en följare som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app. Tack.

 

 

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/
  2. http://expertscape.com/ex/diabetes+mellitus%2C+type+1
  3. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/research/immune-response-features
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nri1257
  5. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  6. https://dtc.ucsf.edu/types-of-diabetes/type1/understanding-type-1-diabetes/autoimmunity/what-is-the-immune-system/
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3805492/
  8. https://drc.bmj.com/content/5/1/e000336
  9. https://www.karger.com/Article/Fulltext/345107
  10. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0130533
  11. https://academic.oup.com/femspd/article/26/3-4/259/638202
  12. http://www.diabethics.com/hba1c-converter/
  13. http://www.ijem.in/article.asp?issn=2230-8210;year=2012;volume=16;issue=7;spage=27;epage=36;aulast=Casqueiro;type=3
  14. https://www.amjmedsci.org/article/S0002-9629(15)00027-0/fulltext
  15. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/31/8/1541.long
  16. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/dme.13205
  17. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2435690/
  18. https://thorax.bmj.com/content/65/10/870.long
  19. https://academic.oup.com/femspd/article/26/3-4/259/638202
  20. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jdi.13002
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-47836-8
  22. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/immunosenescence
  23. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-boost-your-immune-system
  24. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/29/3/725
  25. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824443/
  26. https://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/8/12/2219/htm
  27. https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/autoimmune-diseases
  28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4897964/
  29. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/101/12/4931/2765078#sthash.O0dqagwM.dpuf
  30. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  31. http://www.diabethics.com/science/50-shades-of-diabetes/
  32. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3672537/
  33. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/99/5/1569/2537306
  34. https://stke.sciencemag.org/content/5/247/pt10.long
  35. https://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/18/2/121
  36. https://academic.oup.com/edrv/article/30/2/152/2355062
  37. http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC5571740/
  38. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4705121/
  39. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4448-3
  40. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  41. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent och föreläsare
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smart Insulin Patch

7 February, 2020

A group of researchers from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, David H. Koch Institute at MIT and University of California Los Angeles published a paper a few days ago in Nature where they show that a glucose-responsive insulin patch successfully regulated blood glucose in mice and minipigs. Many have tried do develop a smart insulin that is glucose-responsive, in different ways, this group as well. The only one so far that have been tested in humans is Mercks MK-2640, which failed but gave the researchers some insight (1). Several projects are currently working hard since this would be a major advancement in diabetes management. Imagine if having a solution in which blood glucose monitoring information and insulin delivery are linked and occur without the patient’s involvement, would release insulin in response to elevated glucose concentrations and regulate glucose levels within a normal range, with a reduced risk of hypoglycaemia. There are many challenges, particular:

 

  • Rapid in vivo glucose-responsive behaviour with similar pharmacokinetics to pancreatic beta cells.
  • Sufficient insulin-loading capacity for daily usage.
  • Small size and/or simple design for ease of administration.
  • Feasibility for large-scale manufacturing.
  • High biocompatibility without acute and long-term toxicity.

 

NEW PAPER

Head author, Professor Zhen Gu, has been eager to overcome obstacles and he has, with colleagues, published several promising papers last years. I wrote an article about his team three years ago, after one of these papers 2, and I had some contact with them at the time. They seem to work on different solutions. What is indeed interesting with the new paper is that Professor Robert “Bob” Langer at MIT is one of the authors. Langer belongs to the most cited researchers in the world and have received many awards for his work. Most interesting from a diabetes perspective is that he is heavily involved in the work towards a cure for insulin dependent diabetes, at Sigilon 3. He is also involved in the capsule from MIT that gained a lot attention in 2018 and 2019, that can deliver drugs and avoid to be broken down in the gastrointestinal tract before they can take effect. A very clever solution 4. Without knowing Langers role here he has huge experience in this field, but I really don´t want to focus at him or one individual.

 

The researchers have developed a patch that is ~5 cm², see picture:

 

The patch has very small microneedles, each less than 1 millimeter, that are preloaded with insulin. The glucose-responsive component that “measures” glucose in the needles in the entire matrix, is phenylboronic acid. The needles are diligent manufactured to be sufficient for skin penetration without breaking. The researchers estimate that the stability of insulin within the patch could be maintained at room temperature for at least 8 weeks. Each microneedle penetrates about a half millimetre, the researchers says the patch is less painful than a pin prick.

 

STUDY RESULT

The researchers have previously tested different patches in mice, which they did with this as well. They used streptozotocin-induced mice, the mice (and pigs as well) has been given a drug that targets the beta cells and destroy them. This is frequently used for similar studies. The glucose responsive patch worked fine in mice (n=5), and regulated the glucose for more than ten hours. They also performed a glucose tolerance test, see picture below. The red curve is a patch with insulin but without the glucose- responsiveness. But as you see the patch showed the same result as the healthy mice:

 

They then moved to minipigs, very interesting since there are very few trials in larger animal models. The normal blood glucose range in minipigs are 40-80 mg/dl or 2,22-4,44 mmol/L. The pigs skin are considered a good model for humans, and the needles could easily penetrate the skin. The put the patch on the leg and used Dexcom G4 as comparison, on top of blood samples. As you see at the picture below, the pigs (n=3) showed only a small increase of glucose and returned to normal glycaemic state after the mealtime and stayed there for ~20 hours, during normal feeding conditions:

 

 

 

Then they performed an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and the result was similar as in mice. The minipigs with the glucose-responsive patch returned to a normoglycemic state after 100 minutes:

 

 

The insulin release increased significantly as well which is interesting since they measured C-peptide (5) levels during the OGTT, which was negligible. This is an amazing result, even though a small study sample. Remember that this is one of few trials in larger animal models.

 

WHAT´S NEXT?

The technology has been accepted into the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Emerging Technology Program, which provides assistance to companies during the regulatory process. Tonight I again had a dialogue with first author Zhen, who confirmed they are currently applying for an IND (FDA approval) for human clinical trials, which they anticipate could start within a few years. They also think that the smart microneedle patch could be adapted with different drugs to manage other medical conditions as well.

 

SUMMARY

Neither mice or minipigs are humans of course, and the study sample is quite small. Of all studies of a smart insulin solution I have read, which are many, this is the best by far. The patch can also be completely removed from the skin after treatment which is very beneficial of course. A lot of obstacles to overcome but this will be very interesting to follow.

Abstract of the paper 6.

 

References:

  1. https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/cpt.1729
  2. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsnano.6b06892
  3. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  4. http://news.mit.edu/2019/orally-deliver-drugs-injected-1007
  5. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  6. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41551-019-0508-y#MOESM1

 

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer and lecturer
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 


 

En grupp forskare vid University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, David H. Koch Institute vid MIT och University of California Los Angeles publicerade för ett par dagar sedan en studie i Nature där de visar ett smart, glukosresponsivt insulin i ett slags plåster som med väldigt bra resultat reglerar blodsockret i möss och minigrisar. Många har i flera år försökt utveckla ett smart insulin som på olika sätt reagerar automatiskt på blodsockernivån, likväl denna forskargrupp. De enda som utfört humanförsök hittills är Merck med sitt MK-2640, som jag skrivit om många gånger. Tyvärr misslyckades de i första försöket, men de säger sig ha lärt sit mycket av det försöket, vilket absolut är troligt (1). Flera andra forskargrupper arbetar för närvarande hårt med olika former av ett glukosresponsivt insulin eftersom detta skulle innebära ett mycket stort steg framåt i diabetesbehandlingen. Betänk att slippa tänka på uppföljning av blodsockret och insulintillförsel över huvudtaget, där allt sköts automatiskt och blodsockret ligger stabilt motsvarande en frisk person. Det är ännu så länge en dröm, och en lösning är inte nära förestående, men denna grupp har tagit oss ett steg närmare i alla fall. För att möjliggöra detta finns flera utmaningar, framförallt:

 

  • Snabb glukosreponsiv reaktion i människorkroppen med motsvarande farmakokinetik (upptag/omsättning) som betaceller.
  • Tillräcklig kapacitet av insulin för åtminstone en dag.
  • Liten storlek och enkelt handhavande.
  • Möjlighet att tillverka i mycket stor omfattning, på ett kostnadseffektivt sätt.
  • Hög biokompatibilitet utan akut eller långsiktig toxicitet, det vill säga att kroppen reagerar mot lösningen på något sätt.

 

NY STUDIE

Försteförfattaren i den nya studien, professor Zhen Gu, har varit trägen för att överbrygga de hinder som finns och han har, med kollegor, publicerat flera lovande studier under flera år. För ganska precis tre år sedan tillägnade detta team en artikel, efter att ha delat ett par artiklar om deras framsteg 2. Jag har haft kontakt med dem till och från i flera år. De har visat lite olika lösningar, så de verkar ha testat sig fram lite grann. Vad som onekligen är intressant med den nya studien är att Robert “Bob” Langer vid Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, är en av författarna. Langer tillhör de mest citerade och prisbelönta forskarna alla kategorier, jag har delat en del om detta på min Facebooksida eftersom han även i allra högsta grad är involverad i diabetes. Mest intressant ur ett diabetesperspektiv är att han är involverad i forskningen mot ett botemedel, med Sigilon 3. Han är även involverad i den kapsel som forskare vid MIT rönte enormt internationell uppmärksamhet med 2018 och 2019, som kan på ett genialt sätt distribuera läkemedel via mag- och tarmkanalen utan att de bryts ner innan de har önskad effekt 4. Utan att veta Langers roll här så är hans erfarenhet mycket stor inom detta området. Med detta sagt ska inte fokus vara på en enskild individ naturligtvis.

Forskarna har nu tagit fram vad jag hädanefter förenklat kallar plåster, som är ~5 cm², se bild:

 

Plåstret har väldigt små mikronålar, varje mindre än 1 mm, som är förfyllda med insulin. Den glukosresponsiva komponenten som “mäter” glukosvärdet i nålarna över hela ytan, är borsyra. Mikronålarna är tillverkade väldigt precist för att kunna penetrera huden men inte gå sönder naturligtvis. Forskarna estimerar att insulinet i nålarna håller sig stabilt i rumstemperatur minst 8 veckor, tester i kyla och värme kommer naturligtvis i ett senare skede. Nålarna går inte så djupt, ca en halv millimeter, och forskarna menar att plåstret känns mindre än ett nålstick.

 

 

 

STUDIENS RESULTAT

Forskarna har tidigare testat lite olika varianter i möss, vilket de även gjorde nu. De använde möss och grisar där man inducerat diabets med streptozotocin, ett läkemedel som riktar sig specifikt mot just betacellerna och förstör dem. Detta är vanligt förekommande för att efterlikna autoimmun diabetes (typ 1 diabetes) I vissa sammanhang är detta otillräckligt då man inte har en autoimmun reaktion, men i detta fallet är inte det vad man vill åstadkomma, utan insulinbrist. Plåstret fungerade väl i möss (n=5) och reglerade glukosvärdet i mer än tio timmar. De utförde senare ett glukostoleranstest, se bild nedan. Den röda kurvan är ett plåster med insulin men utan glukosresponsivitet. Men som ni ser så gav plåstret ett resultat i linje med de friska mössen:

 

De gick sedan vidare till minigrisar, väldigt intressant eftersom det finns få försök med större djurmodeller. Det normala glukosvärdet för grisar är 2,22-4,44 mmol/L. Grisarnas hud anses vara en relativt bra modell för människor, och mikronålarna penetrerade med lätthet huden. De satte plåstret på låret och använde även Dexcom G4 som referens, utöver blodprover. Som ni ser på bilden så visade grisarna (n=3) en ytterst liten ökning av glukosvärdet och gick snabbt tillbaka till normal nivå efter måltiden, där de stannade i ~20 timmar, under normala omständigheter avseende mat och andra vanor:

 

 

Sedan genomförde de ett oralt glukostoleranstest, och resultatet var motsvarande det i mössen. Grisarna med det glukosresponsiva plåstret gick tillbaka till normoglykemi efter 100 minuter, det vill säga normalt glukos:

 

 

Insulinnivåerna mätte de likväl och de ökade ordentligt i glukostoleranstestet, vilket är särskilt intressant eftersom de mätte C-peptid under tiden (5) och detta var försumbart. Detta är ett fantastiskt resultat även om det är i djur och endast ett fåtal. Kom ihåg att detta är ett av få i större djurmodeller.

 

VAD HÄNDER HÄRNÄST?

Teknologin i denna lösning har accepterats inom ramen för Food and Drug Administration’s Emerging Technology Program, USA´s läkemedelsmyndighet, vilket ger företaget hjälp i processen mot humanförsök och senare, förhoppningsvis, ett godkännande. Detta får företag support med då det är något nytt, som i detta fallet. Ikväll hade jag åter en dialog med studiens försteförfattare Zhen, som bekräftade att de i detta nu sammanställer en ansökan till FDA om att få genomföra försök på människor, vilket de räknar med att genomföra inom något år. Skulle jag gissa tror jag inte det tar allt för lång tid. De tror även att mikronålarna kan komma användas för andra läkemedel och sjukdomar likväl.

 

SUMMERING

Varken möss eller minigrisar är människor naturligtvis, och försöken är med få djur. Ändock, av alla försök jag hittills läst om smarta insulin är detta det mest lovande hittills. En ytterligare fördel som inte får underskattas är enkelheten, plåstret kan lätt tas bort helt efter användning. Flera hinder kvarstår men detta kommer vara väldigt intressant att följa.

Abstrakt av studien 6.

 

Avslutningsvis tackar jag en följare och diabetespappa som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg, som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app. Tack.

Referenser:

  1. https://ascpt.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/cpt.1729
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/insulin-patch/
  3. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  4. http://news.mit.edu/2019/orally-deliver-drugs-injected-1007
  5. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  6. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41551-019-0508-y#MOESM1

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent och föreläsare
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

Enterovirus in the TEDDY study

2 December, 2019

In a new paper published just a few minutes ago in Nature Medicine, the international TEDDY study group shows that the Enterovirus, long suspected being involved in the development of autoimmune diabetes (type 1 diabetes), is associated with beta cell autoimmunity. Enteroviruses are very common and most are asymptomatic or gives symptoms like a common cold, affecting upper respiratory tract. Poliovirus is perhaps the most well-known EV and there are three serotypes causing paralysis. Important to know is that TEDDY belongs to the few studies in humans studying what happens before autoantibodies develops, not mice as most other studies, and it´s one of the largest studies all categories ever made in children.

Surprisingly the researchers found that it was rather a more prolonged infection, more than 30 days, than a short one that was associated with autoimmunity. Important to know is that Enteroviruses are very common, so viruses are not the sole cause of the disease. Only a small subset of people who get Enterovirus will go on to develop beta cell autoimmunity. A prolonged enterovirus infection might be a marker, an indicator that could be a warning that autoimmunity might develop. Genetics are believed to contribute to 30-50% of the risk to develop autoimmune diabetes (1), more evidence is showing viruses have a role that might be ~30%, but we don´t know. Anyhow, still environmental factors are missing. There is not one single cause of autoimmune diabetes.

BACKGROUND

The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study is a longitudinal, multinational study examining genetic-environmental causes of autoimmune diabetes (T1D). The study follows children at high genetic risk for autoimmune diabetes from birth to 15 years of age in the U.S., Finland, Germany, and Sweden. TEDDY is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and JDRF. The study started in 2004 and more than 400 000 newborn children younger than 4 months were screened for high-risk HLA alleles (risk genes linked to the disease), and those qualifying were eligible for follow-up. Information is collected on medical information (infections, medication, immunizations), exposure to dietary and other environmental factors, negative life events, family history, tap water, and measurements of psychological stress. Biospecimens, including blood, stool, urine, and nail clippings, are taken at baseline and follow-up study visits. The primary outcome measures include two endpoints—the first appearance of one or more islet cell autoantibodies (GADA, IAA, or IA-2A, below mentioned as IA), confirmed at two consecutive visits, and development of autoimmune diabetes. Autoantibodies are the best biomarkers we have for the disease, they can be found years before diagnose, but are today not believed to be involved in the destruction of the beta cells (2). The cohort will be followed for 15 years, or until the occurrence of one of the primary endpoints. Participants today are 5 000 children. More can be found at the study site here 3, but updated figures (in Swedish though) can be found here 4. 817 children had developed autoantibodies in August 2019, biomarkers for an autoimmune activity, and 351 children had developed autoimmune diabetes.

NEW STUDY

In the new study published today in Nature Medicine, Prospective virome analyses reveals prolonged Enterovirus B shedding precedes islet autoimmunity in young children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes”, researchers studied the virome, that is all the viruses in the human body. They set up a study within TEDDY, a matched-nested case-control (NCC), like a subgroup where they compared people who developed autoimmune diabetes (112) with a control group and those who have developed autoantibodies but not yet the disease (383) with a control group. They confirmed that Enterovirus is associated with beta cell autoimmunity, but were surprised to find that it was a more prolonged infection of more than 30 days, rather than a short infection, that was associated with beta cell autoimmunity, defined as autoantibodies. The finding was consistent across geographical areas included in the study, but surprisingly, Enteroviruses A and B was lower in Finland, with the highest incidence in the world of autoimmune diabetes. Interestingly in the new paper, children with multiple, independent Enterovirus infections without the prolonged shedding, were less likely to develop autoimmune diabetes. This is very surprising and the researchers propose two alternative explanations acting together or separately: firstly, Enterovirus is associated with autoimmune diabetes only through its association with IA (islet autoimmunity). Secondly, the researchers discovered that individuals in this human population who carry a particular gene have a higher risk of developing beta cell autoimmunity. The variant of the gene, the CXADR rs6517774 SNP, is associated with autoimmune diabetes independent of how it relates with IA risk. The latter is indeed very interesting. CXADR, sometimes CAR, is a Coxsackie–adenovirus receptor. It´s an adhesion molecule expressed on the beta cell (among many other places), acting as a gateway for the virus to enter the cell. A bit technical but great explained here 5, and for those who wants to go deeper and read about SNP, Single nucleotide polymorphisms (simplified: a part of our DNA and the most common type of genetic variation in humans), you can read here 6. One of the authors, Kendra Vehik, says in a press release “This is the first time it has been shown that this association is tied to an increased risk for beta cell autoimmunity”.

When looking at the details in the study, this picture shows the correlation between EV and IA, marked in red. Twice as many children with a prolonged EV infection developed autoantibodies than the control group, but still children in the control group developed IA as well. Interestingly, also marked red, children who were positive with Coxsasckievirus CVB4 with no evidence of prolonged infection were still more likely to develop IA. More than double the risk, please note that the numbers are low (and important to remember that the risk for disease is still low in general). CVB4 has previously been shown to be a strong candidate virus, as I write in my article a year ago based on Finnish research (1):

Intriguing, they report a new and potentially interesting finding that HAdV-C, Adenovirus, was associated with IA. Adenovirus is also a very common virus that infect the eyes, airways and lungs, a common cause of diarrhea, etc. Both Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus use the CXADR to infect cells. No human study has shown a link between Adenovirus and risk of IA or autoimmune diabetes. The association is protective with HAdV-C, but the mechanism of action for this association is unknown. However, early HAdV-C infections before the age of 6 months were associated with a low risk of IA. No other detected virus was associated with low risk of IA, which suggests that some HAdV-C factors may be involved.

SUMMARY

The result taken together with previous findings in humans support that CVB is a candidate virus associated with IA. Particular prolonged shedding, infection, of CVB was associated with IA. Some questions remains to be answered:

  • Why was there not the same correlation in Finland with the highest incidence in the world of autoimmune diabetes? Due to low cases that developed autoantibodies, or just an evidence of that EV is not the sole cause? These are the twenty countries in the world with highest incidence among children 0-14 years, according to International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas (7):

  • Why was it an association with IA but not cases of autoimmune diabetes? To short follow-up time, with a different result in a few years?
  • What happens if data is compared within the TEDDY study? Controls in the comparison here “…. were matched to a selected control of the same sex, clinical site and family history with T1D (general population or first degree relative) at the time of IA development”. I would like to see a comparison between children with genetic risk, in the TEDDY population, who not had prolonged infection of Enterovirus. Not instead of the analysis made here, but added to actual data. The difference would probably be less than the comparison in this study I guess, but it´s important to know before finally declares EV/CVB guilty of charge.

The mechanism for how the virus can affect the development of autoimmune diabetes remain unknown. The researchers says: “Speculatively, this phenomenon could be related to the persistence of more virulent virus strains with higher replication capacity or altered efficacy in controlling innate immune responses” and further “Alternatively, prolonged shedding could be caused by weaker immune protection in case children. Prolonged enterovirus shedding, previously recognized, may be a biomarker for defective innate immune defences against certain viruses or immune dysregulation that leads to autoimmunity.”

I have written many times in my previously Swedish platform that studies like TEDDY are amazing and beyond important. Basic research is important from start, as mice research, but we have left that stage and studies like TEDDY, DIPP in Finland and ENDIA in Australia, with long follow-up before autoantibodies appears is the only way to find out the cause of the disease. Mice are cured ~500 times, mice will not learn us how to prevent or cure the disease. Studies like TEDDY are expensive trials, but that is a must and the only way to proceed. I recently made this simplified picture, still very tentative but showing we have come far even though some thinks we have not:

It´s complicated to find out what causes the disease since it´s multifactorial and environmental factors involved occurs years before onset of the disease. Certain risk genes is a must, HLA DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8, which has been known since years. These genes are common in Sweden and Finland, the countries with the highest incidence in the world. Here ~23% carry any of these genes, so it´s not enough obviously since, for example, only 0,5% of Swedens population have autoimmune diabetes. Below picture is based on the huge human studies TEDDY and DIPP, and valid for Sweden and Finland:

In 2015, some of the researchers involved in this new virus paper and several of the leading researchers in the world within this field, made a consensus staging of the disease. Still very actual, the picture is from the paper: 8.

All together, the link with virus involved in the development is getting stronger, but genes and virus are not the sole cause of the disease. The evolution of viruses have changed over the years, but if viruses were to blame for being the cause of autoimmune diabetes we should have seen a stronger correlation in these human studies. It can not explain that we for example in Sweden over the past 30 years have seen a duplication of the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in children.

It´s not a genetic disease.

It´s not a virus disease.

It´s sometimes referred to a perfect storm, which I think is a great definition. Pieces are missing, and the only way to find out the remaining environmental factor/factors that have less role but still are important, is to support research and ensure TEDDY and similar studies continues. To prevent the disease, I personally think we must know more of the environmental factors involved. The CVB trial is delayed and starts later in 2020, the reason is that the components of the vaccine was a bit more complicated to produce than expected, professor Mikael Knip told me yesterday. It will take some years until we see the first preliminary results. I definitely think the vaccine can prevent disease in some high risk individuals, but not all. Many trials are ongoing with different approaches on how to mitigate the autoreactive immune systems attack on the beta cells, but for a functional, viable cure for all (9, 10) we must know the etiology, the cause, of autoimmune diabetes and be able to hamper the immune system.

The paper 11.

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  3. https://teddy.epi.usf.edu/TEDDY/
  4. https://www.teddy.lu.se/vad-ar-teddy-studien/teddy-statistik-juni-2018
  5. https://drc.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000219
  6. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/genomicresearch/snp
  7. https://www.diabetesatlas.org/en/
  8. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/10/1964
  9. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/science/mucin-capsule/
  11. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0667-0

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics


I en ny studie publicerad för bara ett par minuter sedan i Nature Medicine visar den internationella TEDDY-studien, som pågår både i Finland och Sverige (utöver Tyskland och USA), att Enterovirus som sedan länge misstänkts ha en roll i utvecklingen av autoimmun diabetes (typ 1 diabetes) korrelerar starkt med betacells-autoimmunitet. Enterovirus är väldigt vanligt förekommenade och de flesta är asymtomatiska eller ger symptom likt en vanlig förkylning, ofta påverkan på de övre luftvägarna. Poliovirus är sannolikt det mest kända EV och det finns tre serotyper som orsakar förlamning. Viktigt att poängtera är att TEDDY tillhör ett fåtal humanstudier som studerar vad som sker innan autoantikroppar uppstår, det vill säga inte möss som i de flesta andra, och TEDDY är en av de största studierna alla kategorier som gjorts hos barn.

Ett överraskande och intressant fynd som forskarna fann var att det snarare var en längre infektion, mer än 30 dagar, än en kortare, som har ett samband med betacells-autoimmunitet. Viktigt att komma ihåg är att Enterovirus är väldigt vanliga virus, så virus är inte orsaken till sjukdomen per se. Endast ett fåtal som drabbas av Enterovirus kommer utveckla betacells-autoimmunitet. En långvarig infektion kan dock vara en markör, en indikator som en varningssignal, att autoimmunitet kan vara pågående. Genetiken tros stå för ca 30-50% av riskbenägenheten att utveckla autoimmun diabetes (1), mer evidens har tillkommit senaste åren som visar att virus har en roll i förloppet och tros stå för ~30% av riskbenägenheten, vi vet dock inte. Oavsett vad så saknar vi vetskap om de resterande miljöfaktorerna. Det finns inte en enskild orsak till autoimmun diabetes.

BAKGRUND

The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) är en longitudinell, multinationell studie som studerar genetiska orsaker samt miljöfaktorer bakom autoimmun diabetes. Studien följer högriskbarn från födsel tills de fyllt 15 år, i USA, Tyskland, Finland och Sverige. Den svenska delen leds av professor Åke Lernmark vid CRC Malmö/Lunds universitet. TEDDY stöds finansiellt av National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDKK), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), samtliga dessa statliga myndigheter, samt JDRF. Studien startade 2004 med att 424 788 barn yngre än fyra månader screenades för högriskgener (gener kopplade sedan länge till sjukdomen, mer om detta längre ner), och de som kvalificerade var lämpliga att följa upp. Medicinsk information om barnen samlas och bokförs (infektioner, medicinering, immunisering), exponering för kost och andra miljöfaktorer, negativa livshändelser, familjehistorik, kranvatten och mätmetoder av psykologisk stress. Man mäter absolut allt. Prover från blod, avföring, urin och naglar tas vid start samt uppföljningsbesök. Huvudsakliga utfallsmått är två – detekterandet av en eller flera autoantikroppar (GADA, IAA eller IA-2A), bekräftade vid två separata provtillfällen, samt utvecklandet av autoimmun diabetes. Autoantikroppar är de bästa biomarkörerna vi har för autoimmun diabetes även om det inte är ett fullkomligt test, dessa kan dock detekteras år innan diagnos, men idag ses deras roll i själva destruktionen av betaceller som obefintlig eller ringa (2). Populationen i TEDDY följs i 15 år alternativt att barnen når något av uppföljningsmåtten (målen), utvecklade autoantikroppar eller sjukdom. Idag är det 5 000 barn med i TEDDY. Mer kan läsas på den internationella sidan här 3, med mer uppdaterade siffror på den svenska sidan här 4. 817 barn hade utvecklat autoantikroppar i augusti 2019, biomarkör för sjukdom alltså, och 351 barn hade utvecklat autoimmun diabetes.

NY STUDIE

I en ny studie publicerad alldeles nyss i Nature Medicine, ”Prospective virome analyses reveals prolonged Enterovirus B shedding precedes islet autoimmunity in young children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes”, så tittade forskarna på den enorma mängd data TEDDY besitter. I detta fallet viromet, det vill säga alla virus i kroppen. De gjorde en fall-kontrollstudie inom TEDDY (5), en slags subgrupp med en studie inom studien där de jämförde de som utvecklat autoantikroppar (383) med en kontrollgrupp, samt de som utvecklat autoimmun diabetes (112) med en kontrollgrupp. De kunde bekräfta att Enterovirus korrelerar starkt med betacells-autoimmunitet, men något överraskande fann de att det var en längre infektion om 30 dagar, snarare än en kortare infektion, som kopplades till utvecklandet av autoantikroppar. Fyndet var konsekvent på alla platser i studien, men anmärkningsvärt var att Enterovirus A och B var mindre förekommande i Finland, som har högst incidens av autoimmun diabetes. Intressant fynd i den nya studien är att barn som har flera av varandra oberoende Enterovirus-infektioner som varar en kortare tid, löpte mindre risk att utveckla autoimmun diabetes. Detta är väldigt överraskande och forskarna lyfter två alternativa teorier som förklaring, antingen var för sig eller tillsammans: först, Enterovirus korrelerar med autoimmun diabetes endast genom sambandet med betacells-autoimmunitet. För det andra, så fann forskarna att individer med en specifik gen löper högre risk för autoimmun diabetes, inte de gener som vi vet är ett måste för att utveckla sjukdom. En variant av genen, CXADR rs6517774 SNP, har ett samband med autoimmun diabetes oavsett relation till betacells-autoimmunitet. Det sistnämnda är intressant och kräver en förklaring. CXADR, ibland även bara CAR, är en Coxsackie- och Adenovirus-receptor. Det är en ytmolekyl på betacellen (likväl som den även finns på andra ställen) som fungerar som en slags inkörsport för viruset in i betacellen. Ganska tekniskt men bra förklarat här 6, och för intresserade av fördjupning om bland annat SNP, polymorfism enkelnukleotid (förenklat: en del av vårt DNA och den vanligaste typen av genetisk variation hos människor), finns det här 7. En av forskarna, Kendra Vehik, säger i pressreleasen för studien ”det är första gången som det har visats att en variant av denna virusreceptor har ett samband med utvecklandet av betacells-autoimmunitet”.

Om vi tittar på detaljerna i studien så visar denna bild korrelationen mellan Enterovirus och betacells-autoimmunitet, markerat i rött. Dubbelt så många barn med en långvarig Enterovirusinfektion utvecklade autoantikroppar jämfört med kontrollgruppen, fortsatt så fanns barn i kontrollgruppen som också utvecklade autoantikroppar. Väldigt intressant är dock att barn positiva för Coxsackievirus CVB4 utan evidens för en lång infektion ändå hade ökad risk för att utveckla betacells-autoimmunitet. Det var dubbelt så hög risk, observera vänligen att absoluta tal (antal insjuknade) är låga, och viktigt att även komma ihåg att risken för autoimmun diabetes fortsatt är låg generellt sett. CVB4 har tidigare visats vara starkaste kandidatviruset kopplat till autoimmun diabetes, som jag detaljerat skrev om för ett år sedan baserat på duktiga finska forskare (1):

De fann ytterligare ett potentiellt väldigt spännande fynd, att Adenovirus hade ett positivt samband med betacells-autoimmunitet. Adenovirus är även det ett väldigt vanligt förekommande virus som infekterar bland annat ögonen, luftvägar och lungor, och är en vanlig orsak till diarré, etc. Både Cosackievirus och Adenovirus nyttjar CXADR, beskrivet ovan, för att infektera celler. Ingen tidigare humanstudie har visat en koppling mellan Adenovirus och risk för betacells-autoimmunitet eller autoimmun sjukdom. Sambandet är alltså positivt, vilket innebär att Adenovirus potentiellt är skyddande mot betacells-autoimmunitet. Om så är fallet är mekanismen okänd idag, men Adenovirusinfektion före 6 månaders ålder förknippades med lägre risk för betacells-autoimmunitet. Inget annat virus förknippades med lägre risk för betacells-autoimmunitet, vilket forskarna menar talar för att Adenovirus kan ha någon roll.

SUMMERING

Resultatet i den nya studien sammantaget med tidigare fynd hos människor stödjer hypotesen att CVB är ett kandidatvirus förknippat med betacells-autoimmunitet. Särskilt en längre infektion av CVB hade ett samband med betacells-autoimmunitet. Flera frågor återstår att besvara, bland annat:

  • Varför ses inte motsvarande korrelation i Finland, som har högst incidens i världen av autoimmun diabetes? Beror det på få personer som de facto utvecklade autoantikroppar, eller är det mer evidens för att även om Enterovirus har någon roll är det inte tillräckligt? Här är de tjugo länderna i världen med högst incidens av autoimmun diabetes enligt det Internationella Diabetesförbundets Diabetes Atlas (8):

  • Varför ses ett samband med betacells-autoimmunitet men inte autoimmun diabetes? För kort uppföljningstid? Vi vet att en del kan ha autoantikroppar i många år innan sjukdom, kanske resultatet skulle se annorlunda ut med längre uppföljningstid i det avseendet?
  • Vad händer om datan jämförs inom TEDDY-studien? Kontrollgrupperna i studien är matchade efter kön, geografisk plats och familjehistorik av autoimmun diabetes (population generellt eller förstagradssläkting) vid utvecklandet av autoimmun diabetes. Jag skulle personligen vilja se en jämförelse mellan barn med generisk risk, inom TEDDY (där alltså alla har riskgener), som inte har lång Enterovirusinfektion. Inte istället för den jämförelse man har gjort i studien, utan adderat även detta. Differensen av antal med betacells-autoimmunitet skulle antagligen vara mindre gissar jag, men det är viktigt att se även den jämförelsen innan vi slutligen deklarerar EV/CVB som skyldig.

Mekanismen för hur virus kan bidra till utvecklingen av betacells-autoimmunitet/autoimmun diabetes är oklar. Forskarna säger ungefär ”spekulativt skulle fenomenet kunna bero på varaktigheten av vissa mer kraftfulla virus med vissa egenskaper såsom förmågan att replikeras eller kanske försämrad effektivitet i immunförsvaret”. Vidare ”alternativt beror den långvariga infektionen på ett svagare immunförsvar. En långvarig Enterovirusinfektion kan vara en biomarkör för ett defekt medfött immunförsvar mot vissa virus eller störningar i immunförsvaret, som leder till autoimmunitet.”

Jag har upprepade gånger skrivit sedan innan start av Diabethics att studier likt detta är fantastiska och viktiga. Grundforskning är naturligtvis av vikt från början, likt forskning på gnagare, men vi har lämnat det stadiet och studier likt TEDDY, samt DIPP i Finland och ENDIA i Australien, med lång uppföljningstid innan autoantikroppar uppstår, är enda chansen att ta reda på vad som orsakar autoimmun diabetes. Möss är botade ~500 gånger, möss kan inte lära oss hur vi ska bota sjukdomen hos människor. Studier likt TEDDY är kostsamma, men det är ett måste och enda chansen att komma vidare. Jag gjorde nyligen denna förenklade bild som visat att vi faktiskt har kommit en bra bit även om många har en annan uppfattning:

Det är komplicerat att finna orsaken till sjukdomen eftersom den är multifaktoriell och de miljöfaktorer som är involverade inträffar år innan sjukdomen uppstår. Vissa riskgener är ett måste, HLA DR3-DQ2 och DR4-DQ8, vilket har varit känt sedan länge. Dessa är dock vanliga hos exempelvis Sveriges och Finlands befolkning, de två länder med högst incidens i världen av sjukdomen. I dessa länder har ~23% av befolkningen någon av dessa gener. Så det räcker inte uppenbarligen, diskonterat att exempelvis bara 0,5% av Sveriges befolkning har autoimmun diabetes. Jag gjorde denna bild för över tre år sedan och den är minst lika aktuell idag:

2015 publicerades av flera av världens ledande forskare inom autoimmun diabetes, varav ett par är delaktig i denna nya studie likväl, ett koncensusdokument av stadierna för sjukdomen. Vi vet inte allt, men vi får allt mer kunskap. Denna är fortsatt i allra högsta grad aktuell, bilden kommer från denna publikation 9:

Utöver genetiken så blir kopplingen till att virus är inblandat allt starkare, men genetiken och virus är inte allena orsaken till sjukdomen. Evolutionen av virus har förändrats genom åren, men om autoimmun diabetes skulle vara en virussjukdom skulle det synas en tydligare korrelation i dessa humanstudier. Detta förklarar exempelvis inte varför vi i Sverige sista 30 åren ser en fördubblad incidens av autoimmun diabetes hos barn.

Det är inte en genetisk sjukdom.

Det är inte en virussjukdom.

Ibland refereras förloppet som leder till sjukdom som en perfekt storm, vilket jag tycker är talande. Delar saknas fortsatt, och enda sättet att ta reda på de saknade miljöfaktorer som har en mindre roll men troligen är viktiga, är att stötta forskningen och bidra till att TEDDY och liknande studier kan fortsätta. För prevention av sjukdomen tror jag personligen att vi måste veta vilka alla miljöfaktorer inblandade i förloppet är. Försöket med CVB-vaccin startar i slutet av 2020, det har försenats något på grund av att vaccinet visat sig vara mer komplicerat att ta fram än man trott, berättade professor Mikael Knip till mig igår. Detta försök kommer ta flera år innan vi ser första, prelimära resultaten. Jag tror att vaccinet kan komma förhindra ett flertal personer att insjukna, men inte alla.

Flera försök med olika angreppssätt pågår för att försöka stoppa det autoreaktiva angreppet av immunförsvaret mot betacellerna, men för ett funktionellt, genomförbart botemedel för alla (10, 11) så måste vi veta etiologin, orsaken till sjukdomen, och lyckas stoppa det autoimmuna angreppet.

Studien i Nature 12.

Avslutningsvis tackar jag en följare och diabetespappa som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg, som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app. Tack.

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  3. https://teddy.epi.usf.edu/TEDDY/
  4. https://www.teddy.lu.se/vad-ar-teddy-studien/teddy-statistik-juni-2018
  5. https://medibas.se/ordlista/a-o/?term=fall-kontrollstudie
  6. https://drc.bmj.com/content/4/1/e000219
  7. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/primer/genomicresearch/snp
  8. https://www.diabetesatlas.org/en/
  9. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/10/1964
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  11. http://www.diabethics.com/science/mucin-capsule/
  12. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0667-0

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

98 years since first patient received insulin

11 January, 2020

11th of January 1922, 14 year old Leonard Thompson became the first person in the world with autoimmune diabetes (type 1 diabetes) to receive insulin, isolated (“discovered”) by Frederick Banting and Charles Best 27th of July 1921 (the exact date is debated). Leonard was believed to have had the disease ~3 years when his father approved the experimental trial, and had only a few days left when he was drifting in and out of diabetic coma due to his high glucose and ketoacidosis (1). Within the first 24 hours improvement was seen, but they failed. Twelve days later, the 23d of January, the team (now including biochemist James Collip) resumed the administration of the extract and finally they were was successful. Remarkable progresses was seen and Leonard left the clinic in the Spring 1922, and lived 13 more years but passed away at age 27, eventually of pneumonia. Photo courtesy of Eli Lilly:

Leonards patient records, as well as very comprehensive material about this major discovery still seen as one of the major advances within medicine, can be found here 2 and here 3.

Before the isolation of insulin, autoimmune diabetes was an absolute death sentence. In desperation, most common treatment was starvation diet and pioneers in the field was Frederick Allen and later, Elliott Joslin. Joslin described the method;

We literally starved the child and adult with the faint hope that something new in treatment would appear…It was no fun to starve a child to let him live.”

They could only prolong the life a bit sometimes but it was nothing but painful. Everyone died nevertheless, you can´t live without insulin. There are detailed information of some of the cases. Professor Allan Mazur have written the most interesting and comprehensive review that I´ve seen (4), about Frederick Allen’s “The Rockefeller series”. Beyond tragic, even though it was claimed that the series was not randomly selected and “ranged from the ignorant shiftless poor to the pampered willful rich” (5). The libraries at University of Toronto has a lot of interesting articles, they write: “Prior to the discovery of insulin severe diabetics were treated primarily by means of a strict diet which inevitably led to starvation if not out and out death from the disease. Children in particular suffered terribly from these severely restricted diets. For example, Leonard Thompson weighed only 65 pounds at the age of 14 when he was admitted to the Toronto General Hospital in December 1921, and was receiving only 450 calories per day. Jim Havens weighed less than 74 pounds at the age of 22, and when Elizabeth Hughes arrived in Toronto she weighed only 45 pounds and could barely walk on her own. After five weeks of treatment her weight had increased by ten pounds, and she was reveling in a 2500 calorie diet which included a pint of cream daily, having endured calorie intakes as low as 300 calories per day during the worst periods of her illness. In private correspondence, accounts in the popular press, and even in scientific journals the miraculous return to life and health of these patients once they received insulin was likened to a miracle.” (6)

There is a great timeline around the years for the discovery here 7.

After Leonard Thompson the trial expanded in the Spring 1922, below are some of the children before and after treatment with insulin, well documented by Banting:

 

Banting and colleagues sold the patent to The University of Toronto for one dollar, and Banting is believed to have said “insulin does not belong to me, it belongs to the world”. Quick distribution around the world was possible thanks to collaboration with Eli Lilly. In 1923, insulin was available at most places. The team behind the “discovery” received the Nobel Prize in medicine 1923, 8.

The isolation of insulin, “discovery”, has saved million of lives and is still considered to be one of the most important breakthroughs in medicine ever. The number of people in the world that are daily dependent of insulin to survive are unknown, but believed to be ~200 million (9). Unfortunately many people still today lack access to insulin. Some other great articles about the discovery 101112.

Autoimmune diabetes is one of the oldest diseases we know that still exists, and sad enough a cure is not close (13). Partly due to the complexity of the disease of course, it took years of research and huge developments in technology to be able to proceed. Diabetes research has also been lack of funding, and still is. We have moved from mice to humans, and these studies are expensive. Naturally there is a competition ongoing as well, a race to the cure. The winner will get global attention, all possible awards and of course financial compensation beyond what we have seen before. The latter is an obstacle as well I think. Recently more evidence came that link a virus to the onset of autoimmune diabetes (14), at the same time as several projects in the world are working on a solution to replace what we are missing: insulin-producing beta cells (15, 16). I am personally confident some, or many, will succeed with these trials. The issue is that for a viable cure for everyone, not “only” for the high risk patients with multiple complications and those with hypoglycemia unawareness, collaboration is a must. For a functional cure for all, we must understand the immune system and be able stop the destruction of the beta cells. I understand the purposes for researchers in this field are several, I just want to see less prestige and sometimes a bit more focus on the patients suffering.

Frederick Banting and Charles Best.

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  2. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/islandora/object/insulin%3AM10015
  3. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/about
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3062586/
  5. https://www.diapedia.org/introduction-to-diabetes-mellitus/1104519416/frederick-allen
  6. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/about/patients
  7. https://heritage.utoronto.ca/exhibits/insulin
  8. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/1923/banting/facts/
  9. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/dia.2018.0101
  10. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-discovery-of-insulin
  11. http://bantinglegacy.ca/banting-insulin/key-dates/
  12. https://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/once-upon-a-city-archives/2016/01/14/once-upon-a-city-discovering-insulin-was-banting-at-his-best.html
  13. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/#history
  14. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/
  15. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  16. http://www.diabethics.com/science/mucin-capsule

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer and lecturer
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics


 

Idag är det 98 år sedan den första patienten i världen fick insulin

11 januari 1922 blev 14-årige Leonard Thompson den första människan i världen med autoimmun diabetes (typ 1 diabetes) att få insulin, isolerat (”upptäckt”) av Frederick Banting och Charles Best 27 juli 1921 (det exakta datumen är dock debatterat). Leonard tros ha haft sjukdomen i ~3 år när hans far godkände den experimentella behandlingen. Leonard hade bara dagar kvar och pendlade ut och in i koma av ketoacidos (syraförgiftning, 1) pga sitt höga blodsocker. Första 24 timmarna syntes förbättringar, men försöket misslyckades. Tolv dagar senare, den 23 januari, upprepade teamet (nu inkluderat biokemisten James Collip) administreringen av extraktet och lyckades äntligen. Otroliga förbättringar sågs, Leonard lämnade kliniken våren 1922 och levde 13 år till men gick tyvärr bort vid 27 års ålder, eventuellt pga lunginflammation (som emellanåt tros ha varit en effekt av hans allvarliga tillstånd vid insättandet av insulin). Foto från Eli Lilly på Leonard:

 

Leonards journal samt anteckningar, likväl väldigt omfattande dokumentation om denna stora upptäckt, finns här 2 och här 3.

Före isolerandet av insulin var autoimmun diabetes en absolut dödsdom. I desperation, var den mest vanligt förekommande behandlingen svältdiet och pionjärer var Frederick Allen och senare, Elliott Joslin. Joslin beskrev metoden;

We literally starved the child and adult with the faint hope that something new in treatment would appear…It was no fun to starve a child to let him live.”

De kunde endast förlänga livet en del emellanåt men det var inget annat än plågsamt. Alla dog, ingen kan leva utan insulin. Det finns detaljerad information om ett antal av patienterna, professor Allan Mazur har skrivit den mest intressanta och omfattande jag läst, om Frederick Allens ”The Rockefeller series”. Jag skrev om detta för två år sedan 4. Bortom tragiskt, och detta sagt trots att Allen sägs ha förskönat statistiken (5). Biblioteken vid University of Toronto har en mängd intressant material i ämnet, de skiver bland annat: “Prior to the discovery of insulin severe diabetics were treated primarily by means of a strict diet which inevitably led to starvation if not out and out death from the disease. Children in particular suffered terribly from these severely restricted diets. For example, Leonard Thompson weighed only 65 pounds at the age of 14 when he was admitted to the Toronto General Hospital in December 1921, and was receiving only 450 calories per day. Jim Havens weighed less than 74 pounds at the age of 22, and when Elizabeth Hughes arrived in Toronto she weighed only 45 pounds and could barely walk on her own. After five weeks of treatment her weight had increased by ten pounds, and she was reveling in a 2500 calorie diet which included a pint of cream daily, having endured calorie intakes as low as 300 calories per day during the worst periods of her illness. In private correspondence, accounts in the popular press, and even in scientific journals the miraculous return to life and health of these patients once they received insulin was likened to a miracle.” (6)

Det finns även en enkel men fin tidslinje runt åren för upptäckten, här 7.

Efter Leonard Thompson utvidgades behandlingen våren 1922, här är ett antal av de barn Banting dokumenterade väl, före och efter insättande av insulin:

Banting med kollegor sålde patentet till University of Toronto för en dollar, och Banting sägs ha sagt ”insulin does not belong to me, it belongs to the world”. Snabb distribution runt världen möjliggjordes tack vare ett samarbete med Eli Lilly. 1923, året efter det lyckosamma försöker på Leonard, fanns det på de flesta platser. Teamet belönades med 1923 års Nobelpris i medicin 8.

Isolerandet av insulin, ”upptäckten”, har räddat livet på oräkneligt många miljoner människor och räknas än idag som en av de största upptäckterna inom medicin någonsin. Antalet idag dagligen beroende av insulin är okänt, men tros vara ~200 miljoner (9). Tyvärr har än idag inte alla idag tillgång till insulin. Ytterligare ett par mycket fina artiklar i ämnet finns här för den intresserade 101112.

Diabetes är en av de äldsta sjukdomar vi känner till, men ett botemedel är tyvärr inte nära förestående (13). Delvis på grund av komplexiteten för sjukdomen naturligtvis, det tog åratal av forskning och krävdes stora tekniska framsteg för att över huvudtaget komma framåt. Diabetesforskningen har också lidit av brist på medel, och gör det fortfarande. Vi har förflyttat oss från forskning på möss allena, till människor, och de studierna är kostsamma. Naturligtvis pågår även en kapplöpning mot botemedlet. Den som lyckas får enorm global uppmärksamhet, ära och berömmelse och alla möjliga utmärkelser, men även ekonomisk kompensation sannolikt bortom vad som hittills setts. Det senare är tyvärr även ett hinder tror jag. Nyligen visade jag att hypotesen för att virus är inblandat i utvecklingen av autoimmun diabetes stärkts (13), samtidigt som det pågår flera projekt i världen som syftar till att ersätta det vi saknar: insulinproducerande betaceller (1516). Jag är helt övertygad om att någon, eller flera, av dessa kommer lyckas. Problemet är att vi för ett botemedel för alla och inte “bara” högriskpatienter med komplikationer eller som inte känner av sina hypoglykemier, hypoglykemisk omedvetenhet, så måste forskarna samarbeta. För ett funktionellt botemedel måste vi förstå vad som felar i immunförsvaret, och kunna stoppa det från att angripa våra betaceller. Jag om någon vet att många av dessa forskares syften är flera, jag när dock en önskan om att se lite mindre prestige och emellanåt ett större fokus på de patienter som lider. Med det sistnämnda inte sagt att det idag är ovidkommande för åtminstone majoriteten av forskarna.

Frederick Banting och Charles Best.

 

Avslutningsvis tackar jag en följare och diabetespappa som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg, som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app. Tack.

 

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  2. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/islandora/object/insulin%3AM10015
  3. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/about
  4. http://www.diabethics.com/science/insulinproduktion
  5. https://www.diapedia.org/introduction-to-diabetes-mellitus/1104519416/frederick-allen
  6. https://insulin.library.utoronto.ca/about/patients
  7. https://heritage.utoronto.ca/exhibits/insulin
  8. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/1923/banting/facts/
  9. https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/dia.2018.0101
  10. https://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/the-discovery-of-insulin
  11. http://bantinglegacy.ca/banting-insulin/key-dates/
  12. https://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/once-upon-a-city-archives/2016/01/14/once-upon-a-city-discovering-insulin-was-banting-at-his-best.html
  13. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/#history
  14. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/
  15. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes
  16. http://www.diabethics.com/science/mucin-capsule/

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent och föreläsare
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics