Rare case of eventually reversed T1D

24 October, 2020

I was not sure which headline I would choose for this article, since the word “reverse” or “cured” are very charged terms for us living with autoimmune diabetes/type 1 diabetes. As everybody know there is no way to prevent or cure the disease, and in general we get mad or make fun (me too) of this “friendly suggestions”. A group of US researchers have published a review in The New England Journal of Medicine, NEJM, that raise more questions than answers and after a frequent dialogue with the authors it’s clear they don’t know much either. What is very clear though is that a boy in US who had (?) both autoimmune diabetes and a rare pathogenic mutation in STAT1 seems to be free from both conditions. Will it last? Nobody knows. Can this be applied to others? Nobody knows that either.

 

STAT1

MedlinePlus has a great description of this very rare disease and background: “The STAT1 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in multiple immune system functions, including the body’s defense against a fungus called Candida. When the immune system recognizes Candida, it generates cells called Th17 cells. These cells produce signaling molecules (cytokines) called the interleukin-17 (IL-17) family as part of an immune process called the IL-17 pathway. The IL-17 pathway creates inflammation, sending other cytokines and white blood cells that fight foreign invaders and promote tissue repair. In addition, the IL-17 pathway promotes the production of certain antimicrobial protein segments (peptides) that control growth of Candida on the surface of mucous membranes. The STAT1 protein helps keep the immune system in balance by controlling the IL-17 pathway. When the STAT1 protein is turned on (activated), it blocks (inhibits) this pathway. In contrast to its inhibitory role in the IL-17 pathway, the STAT1 protein helps promote other immune processes called the interferon-alpha/beta (IFNA/B) and interferon-gamma (IFNG) signaling pathways. The IFNA/B pathway is important in defense against viruses, and the IFNG pathway helps fight a type of bacteria called mycobacteria, which includes the bacterium that causes tuberculosis.” Source 1, and another short description of this very rare disease 2.

 

 

THE CASE REPORT

Lisa Forbes from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston published a short review in NEJM a few days ago, together with some colleagues. They describe a 15 year old boy that a few years ago presented with a history of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, chronic diarrhea, oral and rectal ulcers, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, and hypogammaglobulinemia. Two years later, when he was 17 years of age, he had a diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA, 3) high HbA1c, low C-peptide (4) and positive GAD-autoantibodies and was presented with autoimmune diabetes. Nine months after the diagnosis of autoimmune diabetes a reassessment of his clinical picture was made and a whole-exome sequencing showed a pathogenic mutation in STAT1 that confirmed the diagnosis of STAT1 gain-of-function disease.

The boy began to receive Ruxolitinib twice a day, a drug that works as an inhibitor of Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and 2, as a treatment for STAT1. Ruxolitinib is used to treat several diseases 5. 21 months after the patient received a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and 12 months after the initiation of ruxolitinib therapy exogenous insulin was discontinued, and the patient remained euglycemic. See pictures below.

 

The authors wrote: “The way in which STAT1 gain of function leads to autoimmunity is thought to be possibly related to inappropriate lymphocyte activation and signaling. Studies of the peripheral blood of patients with STAT1 gain of function have shown impaired natural-killer-cell function, abnormal T helper (Th) type 1 cells and follicular helper T-cell responses, and decreased type 17 helper T (Th17) polarization.” The boy have not used insulin for years but the authors are humble and state that “it’s conceivable this is a transient effect”. Personally, I would love to see this rhetoric more often from researchers. I asked Lisa if anything has changed regarding the values in the graphs above and she replied no to me a few days ago. The clinical picture remains.

The paper is unfortunately not open access, but here 6.

 

WHAT THE HECK IS THIS?

I have read the paper which is not very comprehensive, because the authors themselves don’t yet know exactly what has happened. I have discussed this case with Lisa, head author, for some days now as well as I’ve sent the paper to several leading researchers in this field. All are aware of some similar previous findings but we all remain skeptical, naturally. Lisa wrote for example that “There is some mouse data that suggests that blocking the JAK/STAT pathway can inhibit B cell immune infiltration”, 7.

There has been a few case reports of adults with autoimmune diabetes been told to got off insulin, in general very few details and no follow up so personally I consider all as bogus. Most famous I guess is Daniel Darkes from UK, “Miracle Dan”. He got a lot of publicity a few years ago and later he said he was free of diabetes due to a very rare gene. I have not read anything about his case in two years, here is the latest 8.

Among all questions that arise beyond if this treatment could be applied on others, one of the most important is how beta cell proliferation could occur. Upon diagnosis of autoimmune diabetes it’s well established that ~70% of all beta cells are gone, even though if it would be possible to stop the autoimmune reaction you cannot live with just a few beta cells. This means that beta cell proliferation must have happened, and it hasn’t in humans yet, 9.

 

SUMMARY

Naturally the follow up is to short so far, it will be very interesting to follow this case since even though we lack information it’s the most detailed I’ve ever read. My first thought was that this was some form of monogenic diabetes, there a several known but also a fact we don’t yet know all 10. So even though the researchers have done a whole genome sequencing for monogenic diabetes it doesn’t mean he does not carry a rare mutation in that sense too. It´s also important to repeat the authors own comments from the paper, “it’s conceivable this is a transient effect”.

On the other side, I have personally written several times it’s beyond important to try existing drugs/treatments in humans since we have left the mice stage. Mice are cured hundreds of times and never replicated in humans. As long as we have a drug safety evaluated and sometimes used for years for other conditions, and perhaps very cheap, if having just a theoretic idea try more interventions to learn more how the immune system works. The immune system is very complicated and we don´t know much 11. This is the only way forward, even though sometimes not very good reason for hope. Regarding this category of drugs there is a trial in Australia just started, I will follow that too of course, 12 and 13.

Most important take away is that at the same time these case reports are necessary to evaluate, discuss them openly and remain skeptical to, it is for patients to not start experiments at our own. All drugs have side effects. Also remember that the boy was newly diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes. The interesting question is though if this drug would have effect in autoimmune diabetes with long duration. It cannot of course restore beta cells but if thinking out loud, for example using stem cells to replace lost beta cells (14, 15) we still most probably need to mitigate the immune system. Could this work? We don’t know. Please allow researchers to make the important processes, and support a foundation or direct to an institution. I assure you I will follow this closely and write about this case again.

 

References:

  1. https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/gene/stat1/
  2. https://www.immunodeficiencysearch.com/stat1-gain-of-function
  3. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  4. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  5. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a612006.html
  6. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2022226
  7. https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28292965
  8. https://www.livescience.com/63157-diabetes-cure-improbable.html
  9. http://www.diabethics.com/science/beta-cell-proliferation/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/science/beta-cell-proliferation/
  11. http://www.diabethics.com/science/diabetes-does-not-mean-being-immunocompromised/
  12. https://mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/research/2018/medical-projects-by-theme/student-research-project/using-the-jak1jak2-inhibitor-baricitinib-to-treat-new-onset-type-1-diabetes
  13. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=379220
  14. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  15. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/

 

Wanna support my work? You can via paypal: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/diabethics.

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer, lecturer and consultant
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics


Som ni som följt mig en tid väl är medveten om finns få saker jag har så stark aversion mot som alla tomma löften om botemedel och kraftigt överdrivna rubriker, därför tvekade jag över valet av rubrik. Det här är laddade begrepp för oss alla med autoimmun diabetes (typ 1 diabetes) och vi gör ofta lek av dessa påståenden, inte minst jag själv. Nu har en grupp amerikanska forskare publicerat en artikel i The New England Journal of Medicine, NEJM, som skapar fler frågor än svar och efter att jag i ett par dagar haft en frekvent dialog med försteförfattaren står det klart att de inte vet själva vidare mycket. Vad som dock är klart är att det i USA finns en pojke som hade (?) autoimmun diabetes och en ovanlig genmutation i STAT1 och nu verkar vara fri från båda dessa sjukdomar. Kommer det vara? Ingen vet. Kan det här appliceras på fler? Inget vet det heller, men det är tillräckligt intressant för att skriva om det.

 

STAT1

MedlinePlus har en bra förklaring av denna ovanliga sjukdom och bakgrund: “The STAT1 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is involved in multiple immune system functions, including the body’s defense against a fungus called Candida. When the immune system recognizes Candida, it generates cells called Th17 cells. These cells produce signaling molecules (cytokines) called the interleukin-17 (IL-17) family as part of an immune process called the IL-17 pathway. The IL-17 pathway creates inflammation, sending other cytokines and white blood cells that fight foreign invaders and promote tissue repair. In addition, the IL-17 pathway promotes the production of certain antimicrobial protein segments (peptides) that control growth of Candida on the surface of mucous membranes. The STAT1 protein helps keep the immune system in balance by controlling the IL-17 pathway. When the STAT1 protein is turned on (activated), it blocks (inhibits) this pathway. In contrast to its inhibitory role in the IL-17 pathway, the STAT1 protein helps promote other immune processes called the interferon-alpha/beta (IFNA/B) and interferon-gamma (IFNG) signaling pathways. The IFNA/B pathway is important in defense against viruses, and the IFNG pathway helps fight a type of bacteria called mycobacteria, which includes the bacterium that causes tuberculosis.” Källa 1, en annan kort förklaring 2 och här en mycket bra artikel från Socialstyrelsen om specifikt candidainfektioner, 3.

 

FALLRAPPORTEN

Lisa Forbes från Baylor College of Medicine i Houston publicerade en kortare artikel i NEJM för ett par dagar sedan, tillsammans med kollegor. De beskriver en 15-årig pojke som för ett par år sedan uppvisade en historia med kronisk mukokutan candidiasis, kronisk diarré, sår i munnen och rektum, återkommande infektioner i bihålor och luftvägarna samt immunbrist. Två år senare, när han var 17 år gammal, fick han en ketoacidos (4), hade högt HbA1c, lågt C-peptid (5), hade GAD-autoantikroppar och diagnostiserades med autoimmun diabetes. Nio månader efter diabetes-diagnosen gjordes en omvärdering av hans kliniska bild likväl en helgenomsekvensering, dvs en analys av arvsmassan, som visade en mutation i STAT1 som bekräftade orsaken till hans besvär. Socialstyrelsen artikel ovan beskriver “Mutationerna i STAT1 innebär att proteinet som genen kodar för får en ökad funktion och är ständigt aktivt (gain-of-function). De andra mutationerna leder till brist på proteinerna eller att de får nedsatt funktion. Proteinernas felaktiga funktion eller bristen på dem gör att en grupp celler i immunförsvaret, Th17-cellerna, inte fungerar normalt.”

Pojken förskrevs läkemedlet Ruxolitinib att tas två gånger per dag, en så kallade JAK-hämmare. Läkemedlet används för att behandla flera olika sjukdomar, här ett motsvarande läkemedel 6 och här 7. 21 månader efter att pojken diagnostiserades med autoimmun diabetes och 12 månader efter insättande av ruxolitinib behövdes inte längre insulin, som således sattes ut. Pojken var euglykemisk, det vill säga hade helt normalt blodsocker. Se bilder nedan.

 

 

Författarna skriver i artikeln: “The way in which STAT1 gain of function leads to autoimmunity is thought to be possibly related to inappropriate lymphocyte activation and signaling. Studies of the peripheral blood of patients with STAT1 gain of function have shown impaired natural-killer-cell function, abnormal T helper (Th) type 1 cells and follicular helper T-cell responses, and decreased type 17 helper T (Th17) polarization.” Pojken har inte haft insulin på flera år nu men författarna är ödmjuka inför detta och statuerar att “det är tänkbart att detta är en övergående effekt”. Den ödmjukheten vill jag se oftare från forskare. Jag frågade Lisa om något förändras i kliniska bilden, dvs hur ser värdena i graferna ovan ut nu, och det består bekräftade hon till mig.

The authors wrote: “The way in which STAT1 gain of function leads to autoimmunity is thought to be possibly related to inappropriate lymphocyte activation and signaling. Studies of the peripheral blood of patients with STAT1 gain of function have shown impaired natural-killer-cell function, abnormal T helper (Th) type 1 cells and follicular helper T-cell responses, and decreased type 17 helper T (Th17) polarization.” The boy have not used insulin for years but the authors are humble and state that “it’s conceivable this is a transient effect”.

Tyvärr är inte publikationen open access men här är den oavsett 8.

 

VAD I HELA FRIDEN ÄR DETTA?

Jag har läst hela artikeln som inte är vidare utförlig, eftersom forskarna själva inte vet vad som skett. Jag har diskuterat detta flitigt med studiens försteförfattare Lisa i flera dagar likväl skickat runt studien till flera av världens främsta forskare i mitt nätverk, de som onekligen kan detta område. Alla vi har läst lite liknande studier tidigare men de har varit mindre detaljerade, dock är vi alla skeptiska av naturen. Lisa skrev bland annat att “there is some mouse data that suggests that blocking the JAK/STAT pathway can inhibit B cell immune infiltration”, 9.

Det finns ett fåtal fallrapporter av vuxna med autoimmun diabetes som sagts ha blivit fri sjukdomen och insulin, i regel utelämnas alltid mycket information och jag ser allt som trams tills motsatsen eventuellt bevisas. Mest känt är Daniel Darkes från UK, ofta kallad “Miracle Dan”. Han fick enormt med publicitet för ett par år sedan då han sas vara fri från sin autoimmuna diabetes som han haft i flera år. Emellanåt framställdes det som att han, som maratonlöpare, sprungit sig frisk. Jag tillägnade inte honom någon artikel utan delade om honom vid ett par tillfällen. Det sas senare bero på en ovanlig gen alternativt mutation, men jag har inte läst något om detta fall på två år, här senaste jag funnit 10.

Av alla de många frågor som uppstår bortom exempelvis den viktiga om detta kan appliceras på andra, den kanske viktigaste är hur betacellsproliferation kunnat inträffa. Proliferation innebär händelser leder till ökat antal celler, främst celldelning men inte bara. Det är väletablerat att vi vid diagnos av autoimmun diabetes förlorat ~70% av alla betaceller, även om vi alltså skulle kunna finna ett sätt att stoppa destruktionen så går det inte att leva på de få som är kvar. Det här betyder att betacellsproliferation måste ha skett hos denna pojke, vilket de inte vet. Kliniskt relevant betacellsproliferation sker inte hos människor, jag skrev om detta för två år sedan 11.

 

SUMMERING

Naturligtvis är uppföljningen av pojken hittills för kort, det kommer dock vara väldigt spännande att följa detta fall som trots att många frågor är obesvarade så är detta det mest detaljerade fall jag läst om. Min första tanke var omedelbart att det handlar om någon form av monogen diabetes, forskarna vet att de inte kartlagt alla monogena former 12. Så fast forskarna gjort en helgenomsekvensering betyder inte det att inte pojken har en genmutation i det avseendet också. Viktigt att återupprepa forskarnas ödmjuka kommentar från publikationen, “det är tänkbart att detta är en övergående effekt”.

Å andra sidan har jag personligen skrivit många gånger att det är mer än viktigt att testa interventioner med befintliga läkemedel/behandlingar på människor, vi har lämnat gnagar-forskning, eller borde ha gjort det sedan länge. Möss är botade hundratals gånger men inte en enda människa ännu, detta fall är alltså för tidigt att sia om ännu. Så länge vi har läkemedel som sedan länge visat sig säkra och med framgång använts för andra sjukdomar, kanske även har låg kostnad, finns bara teoretiska idéer tycker jag forskarna borde testa mer på människor för att kanske kunna lära sig mer om immunförsvaret. Immunförsvaret är komplext och vi vet långt ifrån allt om det idag 13. Det här är enda vägen framåt, även om det i majoriteten av försöken kanske inte finns skäl för hopp utan är mer experimentellt. Dessa studier är dock kostsamma och forskningen behöver medel. Intressant nog, den kategori av läkemedel som pojken i USA fått testas nu i Australien på en lite större grupp, jag kommer naturligtvis följa detta noga 14 och 15.

Viktigaste att ta med sig från det här är att samtidigt som de här fallrapporterna är av vikt att utvärdera grundligt, diskutera dem och förhålla sig skeptisk till, är det för patienter att inte under några som hels omständigheter att starta egna experiment. Läkemedel har även biverkningar. Kom även ihåg det viktiga att pojken var nydebuterad med autoimmun diabetes. Det är dock intressant att testa hos personer som haft sjukdomen länge. Läkemedlet kan naturligtvis inte återskapa betaceller som gått förlorade men om jag tillåter mig att tänka högt för en sekund, tänk exempelvis vid användning av stamceller som ersättning för förlorade betaceller (16, 17) så kommer vi för ett effektivt botemedel högst sannolikt behöva dämpa immunförsvarets reaktion på något sätt. Kan detta vara ett sätt? Ingen vet. vi får låta vetenskapen ha sin gång och stödja Barndiabetesfonden i Sverige eller en institution direkt till ett forskningsprojekt du brinner för, det är ofta möjligt att göra. Jag försäkrar att jag kommer följa upp detta fall igen.

Avslutningsvis tackar jag en följare och diabetespappa som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg, som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app alternativt skriver mitt swishnummer 1231576800. Tack.

Referenser:

  1. https://medlineplus.gov/genetics/gene/stat1/
  2. https://www.immunodeficiencysearch.com/stat1-gain-of-function
  3. https://www.socialstyrelsen.se/stod-i-arbetet/sallsynta-halsotillstand/kronisk-mukokutan-candidiasis/
  4. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/ketones/
  5. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  6. https://www.fass.se/LIF/product?nplId=20110602000187&userType=0
  7. https://www.tlv.se/download/18.467926b615d084471ac333ff/1510316391612/sammanfattnig-jakavi.pdf
  8. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2022226
  9. https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28292965
  10. https://www.livescience.com/63157-diabetes-cure-improbable.html
  11. http://www.diabethics.com/science/beta-cell-proliferation/
  12. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  13. http://www.diabethics.com/science/diabetes-does-not-mean-being-immunocompromised/
  14. https://mdhs.unimelb.edu.au/research/2018/medical-projects-by-theme/student-research-project/using-the-jak1jak2-inhibitor-baricitinib-to-treat-new-onset-type-1-diabetes
  15. https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=379220
  16. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  17. http://www.diabethics.com/science/enterovirus-in-the-teddy-study/

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent, föreläsare och konsult
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

Autoimmune diabetes Cure Immune system Prevention Typ 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes