Category: Stem cells

Mucin capsule

30 October, 2019

What if we could resolve insulin production in patients who have lost it, with beta cells in a natural product? Very experimental research so far, but indeed intriguing.

For a viable cure, not only for a few but for all people with insulin-dependent diabetes researchers must resolve, or replace, insulin secretion and also hamper the destruction of beta cells by the immune system. We seems closer the first part since there is a race currently with several ongoing projects, I wrote about the most promising in my comprehensive article in the end of last year 1. The latter regarding the etilogy and what causes the disease, is unfortunately neglected research and don´t get much attention. Sometimes I see comments in social media as “that doesn´t help us”. If we wants other to care and support research, we should start with ourselves. Do we want to support prevention, so that other not get the disease? But this research is also important particular considering that we must know the cause and manage to hamper the immune system for a functional cure. A lot of my focus have been in this area for years, even before I started Diabethics. The case is that we know that the T-cells, the ones actually destroys the beta cells, are autoreactive years after diagnose, even though we don´t know to what extent. In this 12 year follow up they found that “In conclusion, multiple islet antibodies or GADA alone at diagnosis of diabetes predict future complete β-cell failure. After diagnosis, GADA persisted in most patients, whereas ICA development in patients who were antibody negative at diagnosis indicated decreasing β-cell function.” (2). It´s actually the last five years that we have seen studies with longer follow-ups of C-peptide, reflecting remaining insulin secretion (3), that we have seen that the decrease of insulin production continue the whole life, even though in general people have absolute defiency shortly after diagnose (not all with LADA, that can take some time). Here a few of those studies, in humans. TrialNet 4, T1D Exchange Group 5, TIGI consortium who with a large patient group said “we can calculate that for patients receiving a diagnosis of diabetes ≤10.8 years of age, it would take 0.6 years to reach the clinically important threshold of absolute insulin deficiency (0.2 nmol/mmol [equivalent to 200 pmol/L]) ), compared with 2.7 years in the older group (diagnosed >10.8 years of age”, 6. C-peptide decline doesn´t say anything about the eventual remaining autoreactivity, which theoretical could be due to few beta cells working too hard and giving up. But it seems like yes, most probably we have an over-reactive immune system even years after diagnose. The case is, we don´t know what eventually would happen if we were able to replace lost beta cells with own beta cells, since this is impossible.

Regarding replacing cells that could produce insulin as for a healthy individual, some are already in human clinical trials since years, as Viacyte, and some are about to start next year, as Semma or now Vertex Pharmaceuticals who recently acquired Semma Therapeutics for $950M, 7. Professor Doug Melton talks about the clinical trials taking place next years in this short clip of five minutes 8, and Semma later published more information about the trials 9.

Both Viacyte (10) and Sernova Corporation (11) have communicated positive result this fall, with detective C-peptide in patients. The companies have different approach as can be seen in my article “closer a cure”, for example Viacyte use stem cells and Sernova beta cells from donors. In both cases immunosuppression is a must, at least so far, which we wants to avoid for the mass. I get a bit annoyed about the communication skills in these companies though. On one hand, I think it reflect the hope we all have and we just wants a minor progress to freak out, they give us that. On the other hand, since I´m skeptical I think there is also a race about investments which means positive news are heavily anticipated, as well as not mention too much. We are anyhow moving forward, baby steps are also steps.

A NEW COMPETITOR

A few days ago researchers from Swedish KTH Royal Institute of Technology published a paper in Advanced Functional Materials with a different method to encapsulate cells. The group is led by researcher Thomas Crouzier, pictured below.

They addressed the challenge that many researchers for years have met, that anything implanted cause a FBR – foreign body reaction (12). The immune system try to get rid of the visitor, and fibrosis often occur. Fibrosis is the formation of connective tissue as a reparative response to injury or damage, but when this happens for example around a capsule the functionality is lost. Some of the most promising within diabetes trials shows less FBR though. Most groups of researchers use the alginate from brown algae, as I describe in my article above, but the KTH group made a gel from Mucin biopolymer, a mucin-gel or muc-gel. Mucin is actually a part of the saliva. Mucin also occur naturally in human bodies forming a Mucus Membrane, 13, 14, and consists of glycoproteins, 15. The gel the KTH researchers use comes from cows, and takes only a few days to manufacture. The group have only tried in mice so far, mice are not humans, and this is very experimental research. Interesting though is that Muc‐gels do not elicit fibrosis 21 days after implantation in the peritoneal cavity. The picture below shows a comparison after explants (21 days), between alg-gel and muc-gel. Under the picture you see an explanation, but in short the muc-gel doesn´t cause any inflammation or fibrosis, and it dampened the macrophage activation – meaning very accepted by the body. Remember, mice.

Please note that we don´t know their composition of the alg-gel, and cannot judge differences with the alg-gels in other trials. Also, as well as fibrosis is very important that’s not all. Nutrients must be able to cross the membrane of the gels surface, and in our case secrete insulin.

VISIT TO THE LAB

At Friday I met with one of the researchers in Thomas group, Hongji Yan. We had a long discussion of what they have found so far, and what is next. Pictured below is Hongji in their lab, holding a small syringe with the muc-gel.

 

I got the chance to see it, and as a scientific nerd that has worked hard with particular these areas, etiology – the cause of autoimmune diabetes – and the cure, this is like really cool. Also important, why I wear gloves is not that it is toxic or dangerous, but in this very early stage it´s security first (times 100).

First, the gel in a small syringe where it´s kept in the process of manufacturing.

The size here is small, please be aware of that this is the one used in mice.

Enlarged, the reason to the blurriness.

The group sees many potential areas where it could be used, as well as to encapsulate beta cells. They are in discussions with possible collaborations for tests with beta cells and I got glimpse of the coming paper where they move on, which I can´t disclose yet. They also highlight the possibility for implantable CGM´s where this might be used in the future. Technology a person have inserted for a long time have some kind of an anti-inflammatory steroid drug. For example pacemakers, and in the world of diabetes the only CGM that is approved for 180 days is the Eversense, where the sensor has a silicone ring that contains a small amount of dexamethasone acetate. The dexamethasone acetate minimizes inflammatory responses (16).

Paper as an abstract 17.

SUMMARY

The groups in the front line of encapsulation of beta cells have tried a lot of materials and several are using alginate made of brown algae. That doesn´t mean they must have the best and only solution, even though they obviously are ahead.

Why am I excited about mice research, tested a short period without beta cells, since other are some steps ahead? Main reason is that the gel could eventually be made of the persons own saliva, hypothetical. If that would work this is a major advantage since we most probably would avoid immunosuppression. Second, since we are moving forward but still have no solution, competition is great of course. For us as patients we need as many projects as possible, that is not awaiting the result from a competitor. Third, the gel days a few days to produce and I personally would think it´s a low production cost, not confirmed though.

Of course, the researchers already ahead in clinical trials have an advantage considering timing, but I think it´s very important researchers gets the possibility to try other ways until we have something that actually works, particularly since I find it interesting if this gel means we possibly could avoid immunosuppression. Many trials works well in mice and other animals, this as well, but that is not humans. Research needs funding, and focus must now be on moving to humans. We need a cure, and we´ll see a cure. Not tomorrow, quite sure within those five years we`ve all heard of. The first solution we will see within this five years will not be for all, for a viable cure we need a solution where we avoid immunosuppression, we need a way to inhibit the autoreactive immune system and something that lasts. What happens when the gel described in this article disappear? Nobody knows, the researchers speculate that the beneficial effect of the gel on the immune system could remain even when the gel diminish. It will be exciting to follow.

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes/
  2. https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  3. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide
  4. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  5. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  6. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/41/7/1486.long
  7. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/vertex-plunks-down-950m-for-stem-cell-player-semma-therapeutics
  8. https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/06/27/future-innovation-diabetes-drugs?fbclid=IwAR23r2F4QqiRWIg12x07WpPpJEY6LsYCuQU7uMqUt8Wm2K9sPB6-XpGipf4
  9. http://www.semma-tx.com/media1/semma-therapeutics-announces-pre-clinical-proof-of-concept-in-two-lead-programs-in-type-1-diabetes?fbclid=IwAR2f7e0TAEkhtzgTiVABvF52YAnUsPDLiBdtgyEH7WNC4tltIlD3-q4c4NA
  10. https://viacyte.com/archives/press-releases/viacyte-to-present-preliminary-pec-direct-clinical-data-at-cell-gene-meeting-on-the-mesa
  11. http://www.investmentpitch.com/video/0_za40wogu/Sernova-reported-findings-that-further-validate-Cell-Pouch-and-therapeutic-cell-performance-in-Type-1-diabetes?fbclid=IwAR3bJINUsT9cXSHunaSxckZPwwr8nzkg6GTBZ-TSQCe1-43SmUTQVM1l9Bw
  12. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D005549/foreign-body-reaction
  13. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D009077/mucins
  14. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D009092/mucous-membrane
  15. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D006023/glycoproteins
  16. https://www.fda.gov/media/112159/download
  17. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adfm.201902581

Hans Jönsson
Scientific diabetes writer
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics


Tänk om vi kunde ersätta insulinproduktion hos de som förlorat den med nya betaceller i en kapsel av naturligt material? Väldigt experimentell forskning hittills, men oerhört spännande.

För ett funktionellt botemedel, inte bara för ett fåtal utan för alla med insulinbehandlad diabetes, måste forskarna lösa två svåra frågor, som jag skrivit om många gånger. Dels ersätta insulinproduktionen vi saknar, men också bromsa destruktionen av betaceller och det autoreaktiva immunförsvaret. Idag verkar vi faktiskt närmare den första delen eftersom det sedan länge pågår en kapplöpning med flera väldigt intressanta projekt, jag skrev om de viktigaste i en omfattande artikel i slutet av 2018 1. Den andra delen gällande etiologin och vad som orsakar sjukdomen, tycker jag är anmärkningsvärt negligerad forskning som får för lite uppmärksamhet. Emellanåt skriver människor ”det hjälper ju inte oss”. Om vi önskar att andra bryr sig och bidrar till forskningen borde vi kanske starta med oss själva. Vill vi att andra inte drabbas av sjukdomen? Men denna forskning är även viktig ur ett annat perspektiv, för ett funktionellt och varaktigt botemedel för alla och inte bara ett fåtal så måste vi veta vad som orsakar sjukdomen och lyckas dämpa immunförsvarets angrepp. Mitt intresse och fokus på har varit stort inom detta område långt innan jag startade Diabethics. Vi vet nämligen att T-celler, de som i själva verket förstör betacellerna, är autoreaktive flera år efter diagnos, även om vi inte vet i vilken omfattning. I denna 12-årsuppföljning, som jag postat i flera artiklar, fann de att ”In conclusion, multiple islet antibodies or GADA alone at diagnosis of diabetes predict future complete β-cell failure. After diagnosis, GADA persisted in most patients, whereas ICA development in patients who were antibody negative at diagnosis indicated decreasing β-cell function.” (2). Utöver detta är det först sista fem åren som vi fått mer evidens genom fler longitudinella studier av C-peptid, som speglar kvarvarande insulinsekretion (3), som vi fått mer belägg för att insulinproduktionen fortsätter minska hela livet, även om alla har absolut insulinbrist kort efter diagnos (undantaget de med LADA). Här är ett par av dessa studier. TrialNet 4, T1D Exchange Group 5, TIGI consortium som med en större patientgrupp sa “we can calculate that for patients receiving a diagnosis of diabetes ≤10.8 years of age, it would take 0.6 years to reach the clinically important threshold of absolute insulin deficiency (0.2 nmol/ mmol [equivalent to 200 pmol/L]) ), compared with 2.7 years in the older group (diagnosed >10.8 years of age”, 6. Minskningen av C-peptid I sig säger inte allt om eventuell aktivt, aggressivt immunförsvar, vilket teoretiskt skulle kunna bero på att det är för få betaceller kvar och dessa får arbeta för hårt, och ger upp. Men allt sammantaget säger oss att ja, vi har sannolikt ett autoreaktivt immunförsvar även flera år efter diagnos. Saken är även den, vi vet inte vad som eventuellt skulle kunna ske om vi hade möjlighet att tillföra saknade betaceller med egna betaceller, eftersom detta är omöjligt.

Av forskningen som syftar till att ersätta insulinproduktion likt för en frisk människa, är flera i kliniska humanförsök sedan flera år, likt exempelvis Viacyte, och ett par avser starta nästa år, likt Semma eller numer Vertex Pharmaceuticals som köpte Semma nyligen för 950 miljoner dollar, 7. Professor Doug Melton berättar här att de kliniska försöken påbörjas nästa år, ett klipp på fem minuter som jag postade på min sida 8, och lite senare publicerade Semma mer information om försöken, som jag också la ut på mina sidor 9.

Både Viacyte (10) och Sernova (11) har presenterat positiva resultat i höst, med detekterat C-peptid hos patienter. Företaget har lite olika angreppssätt som syns i min artikel ”closer a cure…”, exempelvis använder Viacyte av stamceller framtagna betaceller och Sernova betaceller från donatorer. I båda fallen är immunosuppression ett måste, åtminstone hittills, vilket vi vill undvika för den stora massan. Jag blir smått irriterad på kommunikationsförmågan hos Viacyte och Sernova. Å ena sidan så reflekterar deras pressreleaser hoppet vi alla har, vi behöver bara små framsteg för att bli exalterade. Å andra sidan, eftersom jag personligen är av naturen skeptisk så vet jag om någon att det är kapplöpning om forskningsmedlen likväl vilket innebär att alla framsteg är efterlängtade, likväl de inte vill avslöja för mycket. Oavsett så tar vi små små steg, som även det är steg framåt trots allt.

EN NY AKTÖR

För ett par dagar sedan publicerade forskare från Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan i Stockholm, KTH, en studie med en annorlunda metod att kapsla in celler. Gruppen leds av Thomas Crouzier, på bilden här.

De antog utmaningen flera forskare mött i flera år i många sammanhang, att allt man försöker transplantera orsakar en främmande kroppsreaktion, jag väljer att förkorta den likt på engelska nedan, FBR (12). Immunförsvaret försöker bli av med inkräktaren, och stöter bort det eller kapslar in det med vävnad. Om detta sker med en exempelvis en kapsel med betaceller så tappar man funktionen. De mest lovande försöken hittills inom diabetes visar dock mindre FBR. De flesta grupper av forskare inom diabetes använder idag alginat av brunalger, som jag beskrivit flera gånger i många artiklar, men forskarna från KTH har gjort en gel av mucin, en mucingel, som ursprungligen är en del av saliven. Mucin finns naturligt i kroppen och utgör bland annat slemhinnor, 13, 14, och består av glykoproteiner, 15. Det mucin som forskarna vid KTh använt kommer från kossor, och tar bara ett par dagar att tillverka. De har endast testat på möss hittills, möss är som bekant inte människor, och detta är så här långt mer experimentell forskning. Intressant dock är att denna gel inte framkallar FBR, främmandekroppsreaktion, 21 dagar efter transplantation i bukhålan på mössen. Bilden nedan visar en jämförelse efter man tagit ut kapslarna efter 21 dagar, mellan kapslar av alginat och mucin. Under bilden ser du en förklaring, men i korthet kan sammanfattas att mucinet inte orsakar inflammation eller FBR, och det hämmar även aktiviteten av makrofager – vilket innebär bättre acceptans av kroppen.

Betänk att vi inte vet hur KTH´s alginat ser ut eller förhåller sig till de som använts på andra platser, så det är förhastat att dra slutsatsen att gelen är överlägsen alginat. Dessutom, likväl som FBR är extremt viktigt är det inte allt i detta fallet. Näringsämnen måste kunna passera membranet av kapseln och i vårt fall måste insulin kunna frisättas på ett adekvat sätt.

BESÖK PÅ LABBET

I fredags träffade jag en av forskarna i Thomas grupp, Hongji Yan. Vi hade ett långt samtal om vad de funnit hittills, och vad som sker härnäst. Bilden nedan är Hongji i deras lab, som håller i en liten spruta med gelen.

 

 

Jag fick möjligheten att se deras lösning, och likt den vetenskapliga jättenörd jag är som har arbetat hårt i många år särskilt med fokus på särskilt dessa områden, etiologin ­- orsaken till autoimmun diabetes – och botemedlet, är detta väldigt spännande. Storleken här är extremt liten, betänk att detta är vad som använts i möss. Även viktigt, varför jag använder handskar är inte för att det är giftigt eller farligt, detta är tidig forskning och säkerheten först, gånger 100.

Först gelen i en liten spruta där den förvaras i efter produktion.

Storleken här är väldigt liten, betänk att detta är den kapsel som använts i möss.

Här förstorad bild varför den blir blurrig.

Forskningsgruppen ser manga potentiella användningsområden var detta skulle kunna användas, likväl till att kapsla in betaceller. De diskuterar potentiella samarbeten med flera andra forskare gällande försök med just betaceller, och jag fick en skymt av kommande publikationer som de arbetar med, som jag inte kan berätta något om dock. De lyfter även andra användningsområden där detta kan komma användas i framtiden, exempelvis i implanterbara CGM. Teknik som en person har i kroppen en längre tid har även inkluderat något typ av antiinflammatoriskt läkemedel. Exempelvis pacemaker, och i vår diabetesvärld är den enda CGM som är godkänd för längre bruk (180 dagar) Eversense, där silikonringen har en liten mängd dexametasonacetat. Dexametasonacetat miminerar inflammation (16).

Studien från KTH som abstrakt 17.

SUMMERING

Forskargrupperna som är längt fram i racet mot ett botemedel för närvarande har testat en uppsjö av material för kapslarna och många använder alginat gjort av brunalger. Det betyder inte att de har den enda tänkbara lösningen, även om de för närvarande har ett försprång.

Varför är jag så exalterad över forskning på möss som jag är evinnerligt less på, som är testat en kort period, i synnerhet då andra har ett försprång? Huvudskäl är att gelen eventuellt skulle kunna tas fram av patientens eget saliv, hypotetiskt. Om det skulle fungera är det en gigantisk fördel eftersom vi då högst sannolikt skulle undvika immunosuppression. För det andra, eftersom vi sakta rör oss framåt men ännu inte har en färdig lösning, så är konkurrens bra och nödvändigt för oss patienter. För vår del behöver vi så många projekt som möjligt, som inte sitter och väntar in ett eventuellt misslyckande av konkurrenter innan de faktiskt går vidare. För det tredje, gelen tar bara ett par dagar att ta fram och jag utgår personligen från att framtagningskostnaden är låg, ej bekräftat dock.

Naturligtvis så har forskningen som redan är i kliniska försök en fördel gällande tidsaspekten, men jag tycker också det är viktigt att andra forskare får chansen att testa andra sätt tills vi faktiskt har en fungerande lösning, i synnerhet om denna gel skulle innebära att vi skulle undvika immunosuppression, med anledning av användning av patientens eget saliv eller för att det ger bättre acceptans av kroppen. Många försök fungerar väl hos möss och andra djur, detta likväl. Forskningen behöver medel, och fokuset måste vara att ta det till människor så snabbt som möjligt. Vi vill ha ett botemedel, och kommer se ett botemedel. Inte imorgon, men högst troligen inom de fem åren vi alla hört till leda. Den första lösningen som vi kommer se kommer dock inte vara för alla, ett funktionellt botemedel innebär att vi undviker avstötningsmedel, immunosuppression, att vi kan stoppa immunförsvarets angrepp och ha något som varar länge, helst för alltid. Vad händer när gelen beskriven i artikeln försvinner i kroppen? Ingen vet, forskarna spekulerar kring att en bevarad effekt av gelen mot immunförsvaret skulle kunna bestå även då gelen försvinner. Detta vet vi inte idag, men detta kommer vara oerhört intressant att följa.

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/closer-a-cure-for-autoimmune-diabetes
  2. https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  3. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide
  4. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  5. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  6. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/41/7/1486.long
  7. https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotech/vertex-plunks-down-950m-for-stem-cell-player-semma-therapeutics
  8. https://www.wbur.org/commonhealth/2019/06/27/future-innovation-diabetes-drugs?fbclid=IwAR23r2F4QqiRWIg12x07WpPpJEY6LsYCuQU7uMqUt8Wm2K9sPB6-XpGipf4
  9. http://www.semma-tx.com/media1/semma-therapeutics-announces-pre-clinical-proof-of-concept-in-two-lead-programs-in-type-1-diabetes?fbclid=IwAR2f7e0TAEkhtzgTiVABvF52YAnUsPDLiBdtgyEH7WNC4tltIlD3-q4c4NA
  10. https://viacyte.com/archives/press-releases/viacyte-to-present-preliminary-pec-direct-clinical-data-at-cell-gene-meeting-on-the-mesa
  11. http://www.investmentpitch.com/video/0_za40wogu/Sernova-reported-findings-that-further-validate-Cell-Pouch-and-therapeutic-cell-performance-in-Type-1-diabetes?fbclid=IwAR3bJINUsT9cXSHunaSxckZPwwr8nzkg6GTBZ-TSQCe1-43SmUTQVM1l9Bw
  12. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D005549/foreign-body-reaction
  13. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D009077/mucins
  14. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D009092/mucous-membrane
  15. https://mesh.kib.ki.se/term/D006023/glycoproteins
  16. https://www.fda.gov/media/112159/download
  17. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/adfm.201902581

Avslutningsvis tackar jag en följare och diabetespappa som heter Martin som skickade en QR-kod han tagit fram för mig, helt på eget bevåg, som support. Om du vill stödja mitt arbete så tar du en bild på den i din swish-app. Tack.

Hans Jönsson
Vetenskaplig diabetesskribent
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

Closer a cure for autoimmune diabetes

23 December, 2018

Closer a cure for insulin dependent diabetes? Well, not close but progresses within stem cells have been made 2018, and researchers are making progresses continuously. In humans, without immunosuppression – which is a key for a viable cure. Over time we take baby steps, even though it´s sometimes are two steps ahead and one back. To cure people with insulin dependent diabetes there are many challenges, as I wrote a few days ago 1. A cure for all people and not for a subgroup of people for some reason, must restore insulin secretion, we must know what causes the autoimmunity and solve it, and we don´t want to use immunosuppression (anti-rejection drugs). Of course, it must be safe and well tolerated, not tumorigenic (rocket science), preferable not a solution that must be repeated that often (as sometimes todays donor transplants of islets) and naturally, that can mimic the healthy pancreas in case of insulin secretion, but perhaps as well other hormones is needed even though those are not affected of the autoreactive attack (only beta cells are destroyed, even though located in the same islets). Mice are cured ~500 times by now and research needs funding to proceed to humans, even if experimental. It might be so that when we see a cure, it´s step by step, meaning first a solution for people with severe complications or hypoglycemic unawareness for example.

Recently a new star popped up in the race for a cure, that have deliberately been under the radar for the past five years. A private company, Seraxis, that has cured mice. Mice are not human, but their idea is very exciting. This is a small review of the most promising project within stem cells and where we are.

 

WHAT ARE STEM CELLS?

There is no doubt for my Swedish followers that I have the biggest faith in stem cells, even though much still are unknown.

Cells are the key to our bodies functionalities and ensure that our heart beats, brain works fine, the kidneys rinse´s our blood etc etc. Stem cells are the origin of these specialized cells and stem cells are not yet specialized. You find stem cells in embryos and in human, and in humans there are stem cells in the bone marrow, in the nervous system, brain, umbilical cord, in the amniotic fluid, the teeth etc. The main duty for the stem cells are to replace damaged tissue and replace dead cells with new ones. Stem cells are kind of our guards that try to make sure we are healthy and protect us to age prematurely. Every organ has their own unique type of stem cells, 2.

Why they are of such an interest for medical research, as well as for diabetes, are:

“Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions.” 3.

The idea to restore insulin production is to be able to produce new insulin-producing beta cells and put them in people with lack of beta cells. Since we can control the fate of the reprogramming of stem cells, and have unlimited resources due to the capacity to divide, stem cells holds a great potential.

 

DIFFERENT KINDS OF STEM CELLS

The stem cells that are of most interest as potential cure for insulin dependent diabetes are hESC (human embryonic stem cells) and iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cells). A common myth about hESC is that they are derived from a woman´s body, this is not the case. Today there are three main sources of hESC (4):

  1. Cell lines that already exist.
  2. Spare embryos left over from fertility treatment.
  3. Custom-made embryos created by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), the technique used to create the sheep Dolly.

 

Induced means affect and make something happens, pluripotent means “having the ability to give rise to all of the various cell types of the body.” (5). The idea of using iPSC is to avoid immunosuppression or using low dose, since the iPSC´s can be our own cells, and there is still a ethical dilemma with hESC.

There are many other stem cells but this article is about hESC and iPSC.

 

HISTORY

In 1962 Sir John Gurdon cloned a frog, and his pioneering work showed for the first time that a mature and specialized cell can return to an immature state, contrary to popular belief. His work showed that a mature cell keeps genetic information needed to form all types, even though it´s specialized. (6)

In 2006, Shinya Yamanaka and colleagues shocked the world when they managed to convert first mouse cells and the year after, human skin cells to iPSC. (7)

The importance of these guys research is enormous, and they shared the Nobel Prize in medicine in 2012 (8).

 

DIFFERENTIATION, OR REPROGRAMMING

Differentiation is a several steps process that specialize a cells functions. This is made in a dish in a lab and is a very advanced technology. Simplified, genes are first added to the specialized cell and within a few weeks the cell is converted to an iPSC. Researchers are working hard to try to control the differentiation, and there are some open protocols available (“recipes”) how to decide the fate of the cell.

 

PRACTICAL USE

Stem cells was have been used as treatment since decades, not common though. The first known use of stem cells is a bone marrow transplantation in 1968 2. The potential is huge and stem cells may in the future be used for several incurable diseases. Unfortunately this has led to a million dollar industry in some countries, most well-known are Mexico with several clinics (long and great article by San Francisco Chronicle from August 2018 “None of the treatments the clinics offer have been shown to be safe or effective. None have been approved by the FDA. They’re not backed by decades of laboratory and animal studies or by rigorous testing in humans.” (9).

Diseases that in the future might be treated by stem cells are i.e. heart disease, Parkinson’s, neurological diseases, multiple sclerosis etc etc.

Negative with iPSC is that it´s very expensive to individualize iPSC´s for every human. Yamanaka said 2017 (10), one line for one patients can cost up to one million dollar, which have led to that Japan is creating a iPSC-bank with “super donors”. This is done at other places as well. So even though iPSC are promising, perhaps we must use encapsulation anyhow.

 

TRIALS

 

HARVARD/SEMMA

First paper that got huge global attention was Professor Douglas Melton in October 2014, 11. It took Doug 15 years to turn hESPC to beta cells. Interesting was that he and his team cured mice (yes, still not humans) with both hESC and iPSC. This was cited all over the world, I think I personally saw 200 articles. For Sweden, I spread this myself to National Diabetes Association, researchers and newspapers. We need attention to get funding.

After the progress in 2014 Doug and his team in 2016 reported progress in differentiation from iPSC, a process taking approximately six weeks. After repeated trials they kept the cells in the mice for 174 days. Picture A shows a glucose in healthy mice vs diabetes induced, picture B is an intravenous glucose tolerance test performed 174 days after transplantation and C is C-peptide (12):

Later 2016 they showed more details and the glucose responsiveness was low of about 35%, a functional islet of Langerhans has ~200% according to Swedish Professor Per-Ola Carlsson. Still very interesting result 13.

Doug is working on using a pouch to protect the cells from the immune system that would allow nutrients in and insulin out. An article in Nature March 2018 said he expect to start clinical trials within three years (14). Doug has started Semma Therepeutics to commercialize the solution if it works. Semma has got huge donations, as well from the industry within diabetes (Big Pharma? Not really: 15, 16). Semma is named after Dougs two children, Sam and Emma, who both have autoimmune diabetes since many years. It´s been quiet for a while from the team, I assume we soon will get an update.

 

VIACYTE

Soon after Melton et als work, Viacyte from San Diego started a human clinical trial with their capsule VC-01, today named PEC-Encap, using hESC that develops to functional beta cells after they are put in their capsule. I shared this exciting news everywhere in Sweden, this was the first trial with hESC derived beta cells as a potential cure for insulin dependent diabetes, the third with hESC approved in approved in USA and the sixth in the world by then. 19 patients were included with two different versions of PEC-Encap (sizes), VC-01-20 and VC-01-250. Low levels of engraftment due to a foreign body giant cell response was observed but the cells survived, proliferated and matured to cells capable of producing insulin and other hormones (17). The trial was paused and improvement has been made as Viacyte is making product improvements in collaboration with W.L. Gore & Associates. In September 2018 Swiss CRISPR Therapeutics and Viacyte announced a collaboration for gene-edited stem cell therapy (18), and in November Viacyte communicated commitments of $100M for their attempts to drive forward (19). The idea is to find a therapy that does not require immunosuppression.

 

MIT/SIGILON

Two persons involved in Doug Meltons work later was Professor Daniel Andersson and Professor Robert “Bob” Langer from MIT Koch Institute. They were involved in the development of the encapsulation, and had for years tried 774 different alginates (hydrogel from brown algae) to find a protective material that provide sufficient oxygenation as well as allows nutrients moving through the “membrane”. Summer 2017 these two guys co-funded Sigilon Therapeutics, it seems they continue on their own and not with Dougs team (20). Interesting is that Eli Lilly, again a company that should have much too loose from a functional cure (how was it with Big Pharma, again….?) invested heavily in the company. “Sigilon will receive an upfront payment of $63 million, an equity investment, and more than $400 million in milestone payments to take the Afibromer devices containing stem-cell-derived pancreatic beta cells through clinical trials.” 21

In August 2018 the researchers showed very promising results in macaques. They tried seven of the capsules that worked well in mice, and the main purpose was to avoid immunosuppression. After earlier trials in mice they saw that macrophages attack and impact the islets, which has led to inflammation. They tried different locations, and tried to avoid the importance of insufficient oxygenation and need for nutrients. They chose macaques without diabetes to avoid hyperglycemia induced insulin resistance, and also to avoid the metabolic profiles between macaques and humans. Macaques needs four times as much insulin vs humans to maintain normal glucose levels. They used islets from macaques, not stem cell derived islets, to see eventual anti-rejection. They retrieved islets 1 and 4 months after transplantation, and they found one capsule (Z1-Y15) that worked better than the others. After 1 month the cell viability in that capsule was 93% and after 4 months 90%. The picture below shows the islets at transplantation in four non human primates (A), after one month (B) and in three of the macaques after four months (C):

They wrote; “Encapsulated islets from one primate (CN8800) were retrieved at 4 months and presented with fibrosis and non-viable islets. At the time of transplantation, this same lot of encapsulated islets was also transplanted into a separate primate (CN8801) that yielded viable islets without fibrosis when retrieved at 4 months. These distinct results using the same lot of material/islets lead us to hypothesize that the cause of fibrosis in the one primate may be related to undocumented differences in the transplant procedure or to natural animal variability when using non-inbred NHP models.”

The researchers have performed a small study but with a great result. The islets remains glucose responsive during a long period and without immunosuppression. It´s non human primates without diabetes, but more alike humans than mice. They found that omentum seems to be the best placement. In August when I wrote an article about this at my Swedish blog, I asked Professor Daniel Anderson a few questions:

 

  1. Is it the same sphere that you used together with Doug Melton in 2016? (22Professor Anderson: Yes.
  2. I assume this is not only considered for a selected subgroup of patients? Professor Anderson: Our hope is to use islets derived from stem cells to treat patients.  I’m hopeful this will be done by our company Sigilon in collaboration with Eli Lilly.
  3. What is next step for you? Humans with similar approach or NHP with stem cells? Professor Anderson: We are working both to take the technology to humans, and to improve it further.

 

I asked if they continue to collaborate with Doug Melton or on their own, I didn´t get an answer on that one.

The paper from August 2018 23.

 

BETA O2

Professor Per-Ola Carlsson at Uppsala University performed a study in humans, published last year, with an encapsulation (also alginate) from Israeli Beta O2 – without immunosuppression. Read here why this is not necessary 24. Initially the plan was to enroll eight participants but it ended with only four, all have had autoimmune diabetes at least 30 years. All got one encapsulation except from one patient who got two, and they kept it 3-6 months. Every patient got two ports to deliver oxygen with a machine once a day, and the islets were from donors – not stem cells. The result below, A is C-peptide, B is A1c and C is insulin need:

At first sight it looks negative but it is experimental to evaluate safety and acceptance of the body. Insulin secretion and glucose regulation didn´t work properly, but the capsule was safe and quite well tolerated by the body and the cell survival was good. As far as I know this is the first study with a capsule in humans with autoimmune diabetes that haven´t used immunosuppression. Study here 25.

 

SERNOVA

Sernova Corporation is a company from London, Ontario Canada (quite cool that London is also the birth place of insulin, where Frederick Banting got the idea almost 100 years ago). Sernova has a cell pouch sized as a credit card where beta cells can be placed. The cell pouch is thought to be well accepted of the body and the implantation is a simple procedure, just under the skin. They have done smaller studies in animals with great results, and got FDA approval for a study in humans end of 2017. Sernova enrolled first patient 20th of December 26.  Sernova believes anti-rejection drugs is not necessary, or very low dose. I asked them for a Swedish article Spring 2018 how they plan to do in this study, and they replied that anti-rejection drugs will be given to patients at latest three weeks after start and continue for three weeks. Safety first of course. Cell pouch will first be tested in patients with hypoglycaemia unawareness in six months. At this point a decision will be made with regards to the transplant of a second islet dose with subsequent safety and efficacy follow up. The study is conducted at University of Chicago and they will use donor islets. Technology here 27, they got some local media attention this Spring 28.

 

DRI

Diabetes Research Institute in Miami have several great researchers. A few days ago, they actually posted that their director, Dr. Camillo Ricordi, was recognized as the world’s leading expert in islet transplantation 29. DRI has developed a BioHub which is very interesting but still experimental, like a mini organ 30. The considered site in the body is similar as to what Sigilon-researchers found in their latest study, the omentum. They have a FDA approval for a phase I/II study where they will use donor islets and anti-rejection drugs, and place their biologic scaffold in omentum.

DRI has tested the BioHub in three patients, under development searching for the best site and the best material. In 2015 Wendy Peacock with long-term diabetes was the first to receive the BioHub. She have had autoimmune diabetes since she was 16 years old and within 17 days post transplantation she got off insulin, but according to some articles she still need certain control of diet and exercise. In the end of 2015 a 41 year old man in Milan, Italy, with diabetes since age 11, was the second to receive a BioHub. 31. The third is unknown and DRI replied to me “we are not aware of how many patients outside DRI that might have had this procedure”. Still, these patients take immunosuppressive drugs so not a viable cure. DRI has though a very interesting solution.

 

SERAXIS

A few weeks ago I got very surprised. I have followed *everything” within diabetes research globally for years, and discussed many papers with several researchers around the world. If any specific area, that would be stem cells. So I wondered, how could I possibly have missed Seraxis, present in USA and Singapore? I told them, when I asked them some questions regarding their papers, and they replied We have deliberately remained under the radar for the past 5 years in order to avoid losing focus from our goal of finding a therapy. With big media attention comes sometimes a lot of “distractions” that we wanted to avoid. However, we feel we have reached a point in our development where we will need to work with partners to be able to make SR-01 a reality for patients.”  

 What they have done as a different to all above projects and others I don´t mention, who in case of iPSC start with skin cells in the differentiation process, Seraxis managed to take islets from one single human and re-programmed them to iPSC-state. These cells are characterized and are banked and can differentiate into human islets when they need them, a process that takes about 28 days. As I wrote above, if manage to re-program to iPSC-state the source is unlimited due to the capacity of cell division.

Carole Welsch, Ph.D., M.B.A and Chief Business Officer at Seraxis, told me that their differentiation protocol is more efficient than many others, I can´t judge about that. They claim their cells have a better response profile to glucose, and interesting is that they have their own biomedical device which they call SeraGraft, that carry the cells. SeraGraft is ~12 x 12 cm and very thin, and Seraxis as well use the omentum as a transplant site. SeraGraft doesn´t stimulate fibrosis and immune reaction, very important, but this is still in mice so remains to be confirmed in humans. I asked for more details about SeraGraft but Carole can´t disclose that. SR-01, Seraxis cells and SeraGraft together, doesn´t need anti-rejection drugs, indeed intriguing. Carole responded on some of my questions;

“Because these cells are fully matured, they do not have tumorigenic potential, a fact proved by animal studies. In addition, the encapsulation does prevent any escape of the mature cells away from the implant site. Lastly, even if the cells were outside of the device, the host immune system would recognize and destroy these allogeneic cells, unlike with autologous cells. This is a fail-safe plan and is stringently evaluated to meet regulatory requirements to treat otherwise healthy human patients.”

If the above is confirmed in primates or humans that is huge. One thing that makes me curious, the fact that they started with islets, does that ensure the higher quality? Even though the cell is forced back to a stem cell, do they have a memory what they once were? I asked Carole; “Our cells, which were derived from islets, could remember where they came from and more easily return to that state. We haven’t demonstrated this experimentally.” It might be so, still to be proven. Interesting is that seventy-four lines were derived from the humans donor islets but only two robustly expressed makers of pancreatic fate after differentiation. Seraxis is currently working on a fund raise to complete studies needed to go to FDA and search approval for a human trial. More papers will be published 2019, will be very interesting to follow. This is a picture and comparison with human islets and Seraxis cells:

 

In November Seraxis published a review (32) where they comments status of today, and that they see this method replace current transplants with donor cells. “Initially inclusion/exclusion criteria for stem cell‐derived islets will be similar to those for cadaveric islet transplantation, until the risks and benefits are better understood. Demonstrated safety and efficacy with stem cell‐derived islets is likely to lead to islet transplantation offered to a larger population of patients with type 1 diabetes than currently treated with cadaveric islets.”

Site 33.

One paper 34.

 

SUMMARY

The final word above from the new review summarize status in general quite well, small steps, safety first. iPSC is very exciting for many diseases but still unknown. Actually it´s tested recently in humans for the first time, after a trial in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) halted in Japan 2014. The researchers found “genetic abnormalities” in the cells at one of two study participants, and they were only implanted at one of the persons. As a first human trial I think it was a very positive result later though “…did not improve a patient’s vision, but did halt disease progression” (35, 36, 37). The second application approved for patients Spring 2018, for people with heart disease (38).

Much are unknown with iPSC as well as hESC, and the potential as a cure for autoimmune diabetes. Other interesting projects are ongoing around the world, stem cells are most promising according to me. We will see a cure, not close in time though. Many hurdles remains. Diabetes research needs funding, start with reading this article, share it and donate. Thanks.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

 

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/beta-cell-proliferation/
  2. https://ki.se/en/research/now-stem-cells-will-build-our-health
  3. https://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/1.htm
  4. https://www.eurostemcell.org/origins-ethics-and-embryos-sources-human-embryonic-stem-cells
  5. https://stemcells.nih.gov/sites/all/themes/stemcells_theme/stemcell_includes/glossary.html#ips
  6. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2012/gurdon/facts/
  7. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2012/yamanaka/facts/
  8. http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2014/stem-cells-a-brief-history-and-outlook-2/
  9. https://projects.sfchronicle.com/2018/stem-cells/clinics/
  10. https://blog.cirm.ca.gov/2017/01/17/has-the-promise-of-stem-cells-been-overstated/?fbclid=IwAR2rzcy3O-2qoeBxTBUOY5VF-zOiH4T2i3eNg8qjDJBBjSwwR4P-mvmFSlc
  11. https://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(14)01228-8
  12. https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.4030
  13. https://www.easd.org/virtualmeeting/home.html#!resources/differentiation-of-functional-human-insulin-producing-stem-cell-derived-beta-cells-from-ips-cells
  14. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03268-4
  15. http://www.semma-tx.com/media1/semma-therapeutics-announces-44-million-in-funding
  16. https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171130005498/en/Semma-Therapeutics-Raises-114-Million-Series-Financing
  17. https://viacyte.com/archives/press-releases/two-year-data-from-viacytes-step-one-clinical-trial-presented-at-ada-2018
  18. http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/17/1571656/0/en/CRISPR-Therapeutics-and-ViaCyte-Announce-Strategic-Collaboration-to-Develop-Gene-Edited-Stem-Cell-Derived-Therapy-for-Diabetes.html
  19. https://viacyte.com/archives/press-releases/viacyte-secures-80-million-financing-to-advance-functional-cures-for-insulin-requiring-diabetes
  20. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/flagship-pioneering-launches-sigilon-therapeutics-to-advance-afibromer-encapsulated-cell-therapies-300477188.html
  21. http://news.mit.edu/2018/sigilon-therapeutics-living-drug-factories-insulin-diabetes-0517
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4825868/
  23. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41551-018-0275-1
  24. http://beta-o2.com/immune-protection/
  25. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ajt.14642
  26. https://www.sernova.com/press/release/?id=250
  27. https://www.sernova.com/technology/
  28. https://london.ctvnews.ca/video?clipId=1412262
  29. https://www.facebook.com/DiabetesResearchInstitute/posts/10156040086829016
  30. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/BioHub
  31. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/first-type-1-diabetes-patient-in-europe-is-free-from-insulin-after-DRIs-BioHub-transplant-technique
  32. https://stemcellsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/sctm.18-0156
  33. http://seraxis.com
  34. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0203126#sec024
  35. ttps://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1608368, https://www.nature.com/news/japanese-man-is-first-to-receive-reprogrammed-stem-cells-from-another-person-1.21730?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews&fbclid=IwAR3-baZMhz3phXZ0AN2zDIDYn-CLTw_mokrAVyJVf1ETnWUaBAhhTuJlkp8, https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/03/cutting-edge-stem-cell-therapy-proves-safe-will-it-ever-be-effective?utm_source=sciencemagazine&utm_medium=facebook-text&utm_campaign=ipstest-11780&fbclid=IwAR261AO-tr5XyvBpxZ7WDbTm4HGKqDx96V-aMo36TglK7CAt9uen2xGc_Sg
  36. https://www.nature.com/news/japanese-man-is-first-to-receive-reprogrammed-stem-cells-from-another-person-1.21730?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews&fbclid=IwAR3-baZMhz3phXZ0AN2zDIDYn-CLTw_mokrAVyJVf1ETnWUaBAhhTuJlkp8
  37. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/03/cutting-edge-stem-cell-therapy-proves-safe-will-it-ever-be-effective?utm_source=sciencemagazine&utm_medium=facebook-text&utm_campaign=ipstest-11780&fbclid=IwAR261AO-tr5XyvBpxZ7WDbTm4HGKqDx96V-aMo36TglK7CAt9uen2xGc_Sg
  38. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05278-8?utm_source=fbk_nr&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=NNPnature&fbclid=IwAR0RfsFu7NV0kZaEFValCnZxSjspzoP4FI8cq4TTXOI-3hrW5TwIE22CLvg

 

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 


 

 

Närmare ett botemedel för autoimmun diabetes? Inte nära men flera framsteg med stamceller har gjorts under i flera år och inte minst under 2018. På människor, utan immunosuppressiva läkemedel (avstötningsmedel– en nyckel för att funktionellt botemedel. Sett över tid tar vi kliv framåt, även om det emellanåt är två steg fram och ett bakåt. För att bota människor med insulinbehandlad diabetes är det många utmaningar, som jag skrev för ett par dagar sedan 1. Ett botemedel för alla, och inte en liten grupp av människor av någon anledning, måste återställa insulinsekretionen, vi måste veta vad som orsakar autoimmuniteten och lösa det problemet, och det kan inte innefatta immunosuppression. Givetvis, det måste vara säkert, tolereras av kroppen, inte tumörogent (kärnfysik), föredragsvis en lösning som inte måste upprepas ofta (som exempelvis dagens ö-cellstransplantationer) och naturligtvis, som kan efterlikna en frisk och fungerande bukspottskörtel med insulinfrisättning, men kanske även andra hormoner även om de cellerna inte angrips i det autoreaktiva angreppet (endast betaceller angrips, trots lokaliserade i samma cellöar). Möss är botade ~500 gånger och diabetesforskningen behöver medel för att gå vidare till humanförsök, även experimentella. Det kan komma bli så att då vi ser ett botemedel, så är det steg för steg, med betydelsen först för människor med allvarliga komplikationer eller omedvetna hypoglykemier exempelvis.

Nyligen poppade en ny stjärna upp i kapplöpningen för ett botemedel, som bokstavligt har gått under radarn senaste fem åren. Ett privat företag, Seraxis, som har botat möss med diabetes. Möss är inte människor, men deras idé är väldigt spännande. Det här en liten översiktsartikel över de mest spännande projekten inom stamceller och var vi står idag.

 

 

VAD ÄR STAMCELLER?

På min blogg har jag en uppsjö av artiklar i ämnet, samlade under taggen/kategorin stamceller, här 2.

Celler är nyckeln till våra kroppars funktioner och säkerställer att vårat hjärta slår, hjärnan fungerar, att njurarna renar vårt blod etc etc. Stamceller är ursprunget till dessa specialiserade celler och stamceller är inte ännu specialiserade. Stamceller finns i embryon och hos människor, och hos människor finns de i benmärgen, nervsystemet, hjärnan, navelsträngen, fostervattnet, tänderna etc. Huvudsaklig uppgiften stamceller har är att ersätta skadad vävnad och ersätta döda celler med nya. Stamceller är en slags väktare som försöker se till att vi är friska och skyddar oss mot att åldras för snabbt. Alla organ har sin egna unika typ av stamcell 3.

Varför de är av sådant stort intresse för medicinforskning, likväl för diabetes, är:

“Stem cells are distinguished from other cell types by two important characteristics. First, they are unspecialized cells capable of renewing themselves through cell division, sometimes after long periods of inactivity. Second, under certain physiologic or experimental conditions, they can be induced to become tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions.” 4

Idén med att återskapa insulinproduktionen är att ta fram nya insulinproducerande betaceller och sätta tillbaka dem hos människor som saknar dessa. Eftersom vi kan bestämma ödet av omprogrammerade stamceller, och har obegränsad tillgång genom deras möjlighet att dela sig oändligt många gånger, så är potentialen stor.

 

 

OLIKA TYPER AV STAMCELLER

De stamceller som är av störst intresse för ett presumtivt botemedel för insulinbehandlad diabetes är hESC (humana embryonala stamceller) och iPSC (inducerade pluripotenta stamceller). En vanligt förekommande myt om hESC är att de har tagits från en kvinna, så är inte fallet. Idag finns tre källor till hESC (5):

  1. Cellinjer som redan existerar.
  2. Överblivna embryon från IVF-behandling.
  3. Framtagna embryon genom så kallad somatisk cellkärneöverföring (SCNT), tekniken som användes för att skapa fåret Dolly.

 

Inducerad betyder att påverka att något sker, pluripotent betyder “ha förmågan att bli vilken cell som helst i kroppen” (6).
Idén med att använda iPSC är främst att undvika immunosuppression alternativt låg dos, eftersom iPSC skulle kunna vara våra egna celler. Dessutom kvarstår ett etiskt dilemma med hESC, lite märkligt tycker jag.

Det finns flera andra typer av intressanta stamceller men denna artikel handlar om hESC och iPSC.

 

HISTORIA

1962 klonade Sir John Gurdon en groda, och hans banbrytande arbeta visade för första gången att en mogen och specialiserad cell kan backas till ett omoget läge, tvärtom mot vad man trodde. Hans forskning visade att en mogen cell behåller genetisk information nödvändig att skapa alla celltyper, trots att den blivit en specialiserad cell (7)

2006 chockade Shinya Yamanaka med kollegor världen när de först lyckades konvertera musceller och året efter, humana hudceller, til iPSC (8, 9)

Betydelsen av dessa mäns forskning är enormt, och de delade på Nobelpriset i medicin 2012 (10).

 

DIFFERENTIERING, ELLER OMPROGRAMMERING

Differentiering kallas processen om flera steg som specialiserar en cells funktion. Detta görs i skål i ett lab och är väldigt avancerat. Grovt förenklat, gener adderas först till den specialiserade cellen och inom ett par veckor är den konverterad till en iPSC. Forskare arbetar hårt för att kunna kontrollera differentieringen, och det finns en del öppna protokoll tillgängliga (”recept”) hur man bestämmer cellens öde.

PRAKTISK NYTTA

Stamceller har använts som behandling i flera decennier, dock inte vanligt förekommande. Den första kända behandlingen med stamceller är en benmärgstransplantation 1968, 3. Potentialen är dock enormt och stamceller kan i framtiden komma att användas för flera idag obotliga sjukdomar. Tyvärr har detta lett bidragit en miljonindustri i vissa länder, mest välkänt är Mexico med flera kliniker (lång och bra artikel från San Francisco Chronicle i augusti i år ”inga av behandlingarna som klinikerna erbjuder har visat sig vara säkra eller effektiva. Inga är godkända av FDA. De saknar stöd i decenniers forskning i lab, på djur och rigorösa studier på människor.” 11).

Sjukdomar som i framtiden kan komma behandlas med stamceller är exempelvis hjärtsjukdomar, Parkinsons, neurologiska sjukdomar, MS etc etc.

Negativt med iPSC är att det är väldigt dyrt att invididualisera iPSC för varje människor. Yamanaka sa 2017 (12), att en linje för en person kan kosta upp till en miljon dollar vilket har lett till att Japan skapat en iPSC-bank från ”superdonatorer”. Detta görs även på ett par platser till. Så även om iPSC är lovande måste vi kanske använda en kapsel i alla fall.

 

FÖRSÖK

 

HARVARD/SEMMA

Första studien som rönte uppmärksamhet med iPSC och diabetes var Professor Doug Melton i oktober 2014, 13. Det tog honom 15 år att konvertera hESC till betaceller. Intressant var Doug med kollegor botade möss (ja, inte människor med andra ord) med både hESC och iPSC. Detta framsteg var enormt och citerades runt hela världen, jag tror jag själv läste 200 artiklar. I Sverige så spred jag detta till Diabetesförbundet, forskare och flera av våra stora tidningar, detta var innan jag startade Diabethics. Det skrevs om även i Sverige, vi behöver uppmärksamhet för att få medel till forskningen. I min kategori/tagg stamceller är många av artiklarna om Doug eller berör hans forskning.

Efter framstegen 2014 har teamet publicerat flera artiklar med framsteg gällande differentieringen från iPSC, en process som tar ungefär sex veckor. Bland annat 2016 då de efter upprepade försök lät mössen ha cellerna i 174 dagar. Bild A visar blodsockret hos friska möss vs möss med inducerad diabetes, bild B är ett intravenöst glukostoleranstest gjort 174 dagar efter transplantation och bild C är C-peptid (14):

Senare under 2016 visade de mer detaljer och glukosresponsen var låg om ca 35%, en fungerande Langerhansk cellö har ~200% enligt professor Per-Ola Carlsson vid Uppsala universitet. Fortsatt mycket intressant naturligtvis 15.

Doug arbetar med att använda en kapsel för att skydda cellerna från immunförsvaret och som tillåter näringsämnen och syre in och insulin ut. I en artikel i Nature i mars 2018 säger han att humanförsök förväntas starta inom tre år (16).

Doug startade Semma Therepeutics för att kommersialisera produkten om den fungerar. Semma har fått stora finansiella bidrag, likväl som från industrin (Big Pharma? Nä: 17, 18). Semma är namngett efter Dougs två barn, Sam och Emma, som båda har autoimmun diabetes sedan många år. Det har varit tyst en tid från teamet, jag antar att det inte dröjer så länge förrän vi får höra mer.

 

VIACYTE

Kort efter Melton och hans kollegors arbete, startade Viacyte från San Diego kliniska försök med deras kapsel VC-01, idag benämnd PEC-Encap, där de använder hESC som utvecklas till funktionella betaceller efter att de satts i kapseln och transplanterats. Jag delade denna fantastiska nyhet överallt i Sverige, detta var det första humanförsöket med betaceller framtagna av hESC som ett potentiellt botemedel mot insulinbehandlad diabetes, det tredje med hESC som blivit godkänt i USA och det blott sjätte i världen vid tidpunkten. 19 patienter inkluderades med två versioner av PEC-Encap (storlekar), VC-01-20 och VC-01-250. Mindre grad av införlivande och acceptans sågs på grund av angrepp av makrofager men cellerna överlevde, delade sig och utvecklades till celler kapabla att producera insulin och andra hormoner (19). Försöket avbröts för att göra förbättringar tillsammans med W.L. Gore & Associates. I september 2018 annonserades ett samarbete mellan Viacyte och schweiziska CRISPR Therapeutics för genediterad stamcellsterapi (20), och i november kommunicerade Viacyte bidrag om 100 miljoner dollar för att fortsätta detta intressanta projekt (21). Idén är att finna ett sätt som inte kräver avstötningsmedel.

 

SIGILON

I augusti i år kommunicerades väldigt lovande försök av forskare som ingått i teamet med Doug Melton. Två av de som arbetat med kapseln verkar onekligen ha lämnat Doug Melton och har fortsatt på egen hand. De testade en kapsel på primater, med syftet att testa kroppens reaktion och utan immunosuppression, resultatet var mycket bra trots försöksdjur och inte människor samt få till antalet. Dessutom en längre period, oerhört lovande. Även de har startat ett bolag för kommersialisering, Sigilon Therapeutics, som fått enormt finansiellt stöd av Eli Lilly (Big Pharma igen? Eller så inte).

Jag ställde lite frågor till professor Daniel Andersson inför min artikel om detta i augusti.

  1. Är det samma kapsel som användes vid tidigare lyckade försök på möss (22)? Svar: ja.
  2. I slutet kommenterar ni att detta lyckosamma resultat visar sig säkert och fungerande, och att ni därmed är säkra på motsvarande resultat på en ”utvald grupp människor med exempelvis omedveten hypoglykemi”. När jag läser denna studie och ert tidigare arbete ser jag ett bredare användningsområde, förutsatt att stamceller kan användas? Svar: absolut ja. Vår förhoppning är att ta fram cellöar från stamceller. Vi är hoppfulla att detta kommer vara möjligt i vårt samarbete med Sigilon och Eli Lilly.
  3. Vad är nästa steg, apor med diabetes och stamceller eller människor med kapslar och celler från donatorer? Svar:Vi arbetar parallellt med avsikten att ta detta till människor och att förbättra tekniken ytterligare.

 

Jag frågade även om samarbetet med Doug, den frågan förblev obesvarad, väntat.

Avslutningsvis skriver forskarna att deras metod kan komma användas i flera avseende, exempelvis vid behov att precis och lokalt distribuera läkemedel till specifika platser i kroppen, för behandling av andra sjukdomar som Parkinsons, hemofoli (blödarsjuka) och andra.

Mer utförligt om detta spännande här 23.

 

BETA O2

Uppsala universitet är långt gången inom stamceller för diabetesbehandling, och professor Per-Ola Carlsson har lett ett försök med israeliska Beta O2´s kapsel. På fyra patienter med autoimmun diabetes sattes kapseln, utan immunosuppression, och planen var initialt att utöka till totalt åtta patienter. Studien fortsatte inte som planerat med ytterligare fyra deltagare då ingen metabol fördel syntes, dvs nivåer av C-peptid och reglering av glukos. Efter avslutade försök fanns fullt fungerande cellöar men också motsatt. I betacellerna produceras även amylin som frisätts med insulin. Forskarna skriver att om amylin inte transporteras från cellöarna, exempelvis just pga att de inte införlivats i kroppen tillräckligt, kan amylin ”stacka” och blockera cellöarnas funktion. Innan transplantation sågs inga problem med amylin men efter borttagande av kapseln, och att detta kan ha haft betydelse. Forskarna spekulerar vidare i storleken på kapslarna och alginatets tjocklek spelar in. Trots problematiken gällande insulinsekretion så visar studien ett par extremt viktiga saker:

  • Beta O2´s kapsel står emot angrepp.
  • Betacellerna har god överlevnad.
  • Försöket visar mycket god säkerhet.

 

Min artikel 24.

 

SERNOVA

Sernova Corporation är ett företag från London, Ontario Kanada (lite småcoolt att detta är ett par km från där Banting isolerade, ”upptäckte”, insulinet för nästan 100 år sedan). Sernova har en ”cellpåse”, en kapsel. Som är ungefär som ett kreditkort stort och där kan betaceller placeras. De tror att den accepteras väl av kroppen och ingreppet är enkelt, just under huden. De har gjort små lyckosamma studier på djur och i artikeln ovan, samma som om försöket i Uppsala med Beta O2´s kapsel, skriver jag mer utförligt om dem. Den 20 december sattes första kapseln på en patient 25. Detta är också tänkt att fungera utan immunosuppression eller låg dos. Jag frågade dem tidigare om detta och vid kommande humanförsök kommer de ge immunosuppression senast tre veckor efter försökets start samt fortsätta i tre veckor. Studien genomförs vid University of Chicago och de använder cellöar från donatorer.

 

DRI

Diabetes Research Institute i Miami har flera duktiga forskare. För ett par dagar sedan postade de ör övrigt att deras forskningschef, Dr Camillo Ricordi, rankas som nummer 1 inom öcellstransplantationer 26. DRI har utvecklat en BioHub som är väldigt intressant med experimentell, som ett miniorgan 27. Placeringen är tänkt att vara motsvarande Sigilon-forskarnas ovan, i omentum (bukhinnevävnad). De har FDA-godkännande för en fas I/II-studie där de kommer använda cellöar från doantorer och immunosuppression. De har testat sin BioHub i tre patienter, och de fortsätter studera mest lämpad placering och material. 2015 blev Wendy Peacock den första patienten att få denna lösning, med diabetes sedan hon var 16 år. Inom 17 dagar blev hon frin från insulin, men enligt flera artiklar så ställs krav på diet och motion, med det sagt är det ingen ultimat lösning ännu. I slutet av 2015 fick en 41-årig man från Milano BioHuben, han hade haft autoimmun diabetes sedan han var 11 år 28. Den tredje patieinten är okänd, de svarade mig igår “we are not aware of how many patients outside DRI that might have had this procedure”. Dessa tar immunosuppression så inget funktionellt botemedel, men de hare n spännande lösning. Jag har skrivit om dem i många artiklar, här en separat om just BioHub 29.

 

SERAXIS

För ett par veckor sedan blev jag väldigt överraskad. Jag läser absolut allt inom diabetes globalt, sedan länge, och diskuterar många publikationer med flera forskare i hela världen. Om något särskilt område, så är det i sådana fall stamceller. Så, jag blev rätt överraskad, hur kan jag ha missat Seraxis, ett företag baserat i USA och Singapore? Jag berättade detta till dem, då jag ställde lite frågor, och det visade sig vara genomtänkt; We have deliberately remained under the radar for the past 5 years in order to avoid losing focus from our goal of finding a therapy. With big media attention comes sometimes a lot of “distractions” that we wanted to avoid. However, we feel we have reached a point in our development where we will need to work with partners to be able to make SR-01 a reality for patients.”  

 Vad de gjort till skillnad från alla alla project ovan inkluderat de jag inte nämner, som med iPSC oftast startar med hudceller, är att Seraxis har lyckats ta cellöar från en enda donator och omprogrammerat dessa tillbaka till iPSC. Cellerna är färdiga, en cellbank i princip, och de kan inom 28 dagar ta fram humana cellöar när de så väl behöver. De har i och med att de väl lyckats backa till iPSC-stadie obegränsad tillgång, som jag skriver initialt i denna artikel är en fördel med just stamceller.

Carole Welsch, Ph.D., M.B.A affärschec på Seraxis, svarade mig att deras protokoll för differentiering är mer effektiv än andras, omöjligt att bedöma. De hävdar även att deras celler har en bättre glukosrespons, och intressant är att de har en egel kapsel som de kallar SeraGraft. SeraGraft är ~12 x 12 cm och mycket tunn, och även Seraxis avser att använda omentum som placering. De säger att SeraGraft inte orsakar någon fibros eller immunreaktion, men hittills endast i möss så återstår att se hos människor. Jag bad om mer information om denna spännande SeraGraft men det kunde Carole inte ännu avslöja, fullt förståeligt. SR-01, Seraxis celler och SeraGraft sammantaget, kräver inte immunosuppression, väldigt spännane. Carole besvarade flera frågor jag hade;

“Because these cells are fully matured, they do not have tumorigenic potential, a fact proved by animal studies. In addition, the encapsulation does prevent any escape of the mature cells away from the implant site. Lastly, even if the cells were outside of the device, the host immune system would recognize and destroy these allogeneic cells, unlike with autologous cells. This is a fail-safe plan and is stringently evaluated to meet regulatory requirements to treat otherwise healthy human patients.”

Om ovan kan bekräftas först på primate och senare på människor är det enormt stort. En sak som gör mig lite nyfiken, eftersom de startar med öceller, kan detta möjligen säkerställa bättre kvalité på slutprodukten? Även om cellerna är backade till stamcells-stadie, har de ett genetiskt minne vad de varit? Jag frågade Carole;

“Our cells, which were derived from islets, could remember where they came from and more easily return to that state. We haven’t demonstrated this experimentally.”

Så möjligen, återstår att bekräfta. Intressant i sammanhanget är att av sjuttiofyra cellinjer som de tog fram endast två blev av bra kvalité och visade tydligt att de blivit pankreatiska öceller efter differentiering. Seraxis arbetar för närvarande med att samla in pengar för att göra kompletterande studier för att gå till FDA för att ansöka om godkännande för humanstudier. Mer publikationer kommer 2019, kommer vara oerhört intressant att följa. Detta är en jämförelsebild mellan humana cellöar och Seraxis framtagna:

 

I november publicerade Seraxis en review (30) där de kommenterar status idag, och att de ser deras metod kunna ersätta dagens transplantationer med celler från donatorer;

Initially inclusion/exclusion criteria for stem cell‐derived islets will be similar to those for cadaveric islet transplantation, until the risks and benefits are better understood. Demonstrated safety and efficacy with stem cell‐derived islets is likely to lead to islet transplantation offered to a larger population of patients with type 1 diabetes than currently treated with cadaveric islets.”

Site 31.

One paper 32.

 

SUMMERING

De sista orden ovan från översiktsartikeln summerar statusen ganska väl, små steg, säkerheten först. Det är ett komplext problem. iPSC är väldigt spännande för många sjukdomar men mycket är fortsatt okänt. Faktum är att det nyligen är testat hos människor för första gången, efter att ett försök på patienter med åldersrelaterade förändringar i gula fläcken avbröts 2014. Forskarna upptäckte ”genetiska avvikelser” i celler hos en av de två deltagarna, och ingreppet skedde därför endast på en person. Som första försök på människor tycker jag det ändock var positivt så småningom “…did not improve a patient’s vision, but did halt disease progression” (33, 34, 35).

Det andra försöket för människor godkändes våren 2018, för människor med hjärtsjukdomar (36).

Mycket är ännu okänt med iPSC likväl hESC, och potential som botemedel för autoimmun diabetes. Andra spännande projekt pågår runt världen, för läsare av min blogg i Norden är det ingen hemlighet att jag ser bäst möjligheter för stamceller. Vi kommer se ett botemedel, inte nära i tiden dock. Diabetesforskningen lider och behöver medel, börja med att läsa denna artikel, dela del och skänk en slant. Tack.

 

God Jul och Gott Nytt År.

 

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/science/beta-cell-proliferation/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/category/stamceller/
  3. https://ki.se/en/research/now-stem-cells-will-build-our-health
  4. https://stemcells.nih.gov/info/basics/1.htm
  5. https://www.eurostemcell.org/origins-ethics-and-embryos-sources-human-embryonic-stem-cells
  6. https://stemcells.nih.gov/sites/all/themes/stemcells_theme/stemcell_includes/glossary.html#ips
  7. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2012/gurdon/facts/
  8. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2012/yamanaka/facts/
  9. https://www.diabethics.com/science/stamceller-nobelpris-och-insulinbehandlad-diabetes/
  10. http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2014/stem-cells-a-brief-history-and-outlook-2/
  11. https://projects.sfchronicle.com/2018/stem-cells/clinics/
  12. https://blog.cirm.ca.gov/2017/01/17/has-the-promise-of-stem-cells-been-overstated/?fbclid=IwAR2rzcy3O-2qoeBxTBUOY5VF-zOiH4T2i3eNg8qjDJBBjSwwR4P-mvmFSlc
  13. https://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(14)01228-8
  14. https://www.diabethics.com/science/stort-framsteg-inom-typ-1-diabetes/
  15. https://www.easd.org/virtualmeeting/home.html#!resources/differentiation-of-functional-human-insulin-producing-stem-cell-derived-beta-cells-from-ips-cells
  16. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03268-4
  17. http://www.semma-tx.com/media1/semma-therapeutics-announces-44-million-in-funding
  18. https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171130005498/en/Semma-Therapeutics-Raises-114-Million-Series-Financing
  19. https://viacyte.com/archives/press-releases/two-year-data-from-viacytes-step-one-clinical-trial-presented-at-ada-2018
  20. http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/17/1571656/0/en/CRISPR-Therapeutics-and-ViaCyte-Announce-Strategic-Collaboration-to-Develop-Gene-Edited-Stem-Cell-Derived-Therapy-for-Diabetes.html
  21. http://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/17/1571656/0/en/CRISPR-Therapeutics-and-ViaCyte-Announce-Strategic-Collaboration-to-Develop-Gene-Edited-Stem-Cell-Derived-Therapy-for-Diabetes.html
  22. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4825868/
  23. http://www.diabethics.com/science/framsteg-botemedel/
  24. http://www.diabethics.com/science/kapsel-for-betaceller/
  25. https://www.sernova.com/press/release/?id=250
  26. https://www.facebook.com/DiabetesResearchInstitute/posts/10156040086829016
  27. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/BioHub
  28. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/first-type-1-diabetes-patient-in-europe-is-free-from-insulin-after-DRIs-BioHub-transplant-technique
  29. http://www.diabethics.com/science/artificial-pancreas/
  30. https://stemcellsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/sctm.18-0156
  31. http://seraxis.com/
  32. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0203126#sec024
  33. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1608368
  34. https://www.nature.com/news/japanese-man-is-first-to-receive-reprogrammed-stem-cells-from-another-person-1.21730?WT.mc_id=TWT_NatureNews&fbclid=IwAR3-baZMhz3phXZ0AN2zDIDYn-CLTw_mokrAVyJVf1ETnWUaBAhhTuJlkp8
  35. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/03/cutting-edge-stem-cell-therapy-proves-safe-will-it-ever-be-effective?utm_source=sciencemagazine&utm_medium=facebook-text&utm_campaign=ipstest-11780&fbclid=IwAR261AO-tr5XyvBpxZ7WDbTm4HGKqDx96V-aMo36TglK7CAt9uen2xGc_Sg
  36. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-05278-8?utm_source=fbk_nr&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=NNPnature&fbclid=IwAR0RfsFu7NV0kZaEFValCnZxSjspzoP4FI8cq4TTXOI-3hrW5TwIE22CLvg

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethicssverige/
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 

 

 

 

Beta cell proliferation

10 December, 2018

Autoimmune diabetes is a disease where the immune system attacks and destroy healthy tissue, in this case the beta cells in the islet of Langerhans in the pancreas (1). It leads to absolute insulin deficiency and a lifelong treatment with insulin through injections or an insulin pump. There is no way to prevent the disease in humans, even though we since long time can detect biomarkers that the disease is developing (perhaps most exciting so far 2). There is no viable cure, but many promising trials is ongoing at different places around the world.

 

CHALLENGES WITH A CURE

A lot of experiments try to replace the destroyed beta cells with primarily stem cells, which is the most interesting area of research. There are many challenges to overcome, the most important are:

 

  • Today’s islet transplantations means we use donor islet which is limited of natural reasons. The procedure has developed a lot since the Edmonton protocol in 2000 (3), and even though many still needs exogenous administration of insulin this method helps many people to a better life. Until now ~2000 islet transplantations have been done in the world (4). Except lack of donor islets, another reason this method is not more widely uses is that the patient must take immunosuppressant drugs (anti-rejection drugs) the rest of the life. These might have adverse effects such as “mouth ulcers, anemia (low red blood cells that cause symptoms of tiredness), nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, leg edema (swelling), high cholesterol or fat levels in the blood, liver problems, high blood pressure, fatigue, kidney problems, abnormal menstrual periods in women, and an increased risk of infection. Anti-rejection medications may also increase the risk of developing cancer.” (5). One of the clinics very efficient in this area is Uppsala University in Sweden, they write about the purpose “the main target with islet cell transplantation is to prevent severe and life-threatening hypoglycemias and hyperglycemias”.
  • If we could supply with cells that somehow is our own cells, how will the immune system react? There are a number of studies that have shown that many patients long after diagnose have persisting autoantibodies long after diagnose. Particular those with adult onset autoimmune diabetes and overall, those with the autoantibody GADA had positive test and less of children with autoantibody ICA (6). What does this mean, if replacing insulin secretion, will the new cells be attacked and destroyed? We don´t know, we are not able to replace beta cells today but most probably yes – the new cells would be destroyed in patients with remained autoantibodies. That said even though “Current evidence suggests that loss of function and destruction of beta cells begins after the onset of autoimmunity signalled by beta cell autoantibodies. Beta cell destruction may be precipitated by the innate immune system and inflammation, and activated autoreactive lymphocytes are believed to carry out most of the actual beta cell damage.” (7).
  • To solve the above, avoid destruction of replaced cells and/or immunosuppressant’s, there are many trials working on encapsulation of cells. Both beta cells from donors but as I wrote above its limited supply, so preferably use of stem cells derived beta cells. This solution is indeed very interesting, I will write more about this in a separate article. Status for now is of course no, it doesn´t work yet.
  • No matter how to one day resolve insulin secretion, for a viable cure we must know the etiology of the disease and be able to inhibit the autoreactive process. Personally I feel this research is neglected quite often. The incidence for autoimmune diabetes have increased dramatically in many countries, a new study a week ago showed a 3% increased incidence per year in 25 European countries 8. In Sweden, with the second highest incidence in the world after our neighbour Finland, and with a population of 10 million, 900 children and at least 900 adults are diagnosed every year. The development is sad, and have huge health economic impact as well.

 

 

OTHER WAYS TO RESOLVE INSULIN SECRETION?

One interesting research area has for years been to look in to the remaining beta cells we all have. Since many years’ it´s well established that all people with autoimmune diabetes have absolute insulin deficiency sooner and with LADA later, but all still have minor amount of beta cells left. Not contradictory. At diagnose in general 80-90% of the beta cells are lost, this is generally accepted (9). The destruction continues over time, different in different people. Please note that the remaining amount is so small nobody with absolute insulin deficiency can live without exogenous insulin, even if only drinking water and eating lettuce every day.

Unfortunately we have no method to analyse beta cells death, we can only measure C-peptide (10). This is done in several well controlled studies (11, 12, 13) and has led to the questions;

 

  • Why are some cells not attacked?
  • Or are they attacked but survive of some reason?
  • Can we use this knowledge somehow, to regenerate beta cells?

 

 

Why a few cells are not attacked we don´t know. Kevan Herold with colleagues showed last year that “During the development of diabetes, there are changes in beta cells so you end up with two populations of beta cells. One population is killed by the immune response. The other population seems to acquire features that render it less susceptible to killing.” (Yale press release 14, the study 15). The new subpopulation of beta cells becomes Btm cells, a stem cells like condition. The Btm cells express molecules that inhibit the immune response. This is one theory, among others. Very visual picture from the paper:

 

 

For decades there have been a theory that progenitor cells do exist in the pancreas. Progenitors are kind of descendants of adult stem cells that can be self-renewed and differentiated into mature cell types, DRI write in the paper below; “cells that exhibit a variable degree of potency and proliferation potential. The potency and role of adult progenitor cells is organ and context-specific”. Some years ago this hypothesis was challenged and researchers meant what we do see is basically self-replication, the differences are several but particular if self-replication is what we see, the capacity is limited due to the small fraction of the beta cells surviving years after onset. In any case the studies above shows declining insulin production (C-peptide) from an already low level, so the regeneration of cells that eventually do occur is not clinical relevant. What is very interesting, if we are able to solve the autoimmunity, can we affect regeneration?

 

 

HOW TO TAKE IT FROM THERE?

In animals, beta cell proliferation occur quite often. Proliferation means events that leads to increasing amount of cells, particular cell division bot not exclusively. Clinical relevant beta cell proliferation doesn´t happen in humans. If it would be possible to regenerate beta cells in people with absolute insulin deficiency, all improvement would though have impact on glucose control. Most probably not to the extent as a cure. One study about beta cell proliferation was published last week, the week before another about what decides the fate of a progenitor cell (read more below) to be an insulin producing beta cell and the third news is a very exciting human trial just started in Sweden. Different research but the idea is similar: to restore insulin production, partly or totally.

 

 

DIABETES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

DRI at the University of Miami published a paper in “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” 4th of December, where the researchers demonstrate that yes – there are progenitors in human adult pancreas (full paper 16, article from DRI 17). The major difference between progenitors and stem cells in the case of resolving insulin production is that stem cells as of today either needs immunosuppressant’s if we use human embryonic stem cells, or we need a method for encapsulation, which still might need immunosuppressant’s. If we are able to use iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cells) one day, we might avoid immunosuppressant’s. This is the most exciting area of research as a potential cure for insulin-treated diabetes but not close to reality, it will take years and we don´t see human trials yet, except from approaching other diseases, in Japan (18). The progenitor cells are our own cells meaning no immunosuppressant’s needed, but can they be stimulated and turned into insulin producing beta cells, cause neogenesis (“de novo formation, e. g., of b-cells from non-b-cells. When applied to the generation of a new differentiated cell, this concept is usually presented as an alternative to self-replication e.g., a b-cell giving rise to two b-cells by proliferation”. Dictionary from DRI above)? We will see.

 

 

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN

Researchers from University of Copenhagen in Denmark and the Helmholtz Zentrum München German research center for environmental research, lead by Professor Henrik Semb, showed in Nature two weeks ago mapping of the signals that determine the fate of the progenitor cells in a lab. Semb describes their finding here in a short clip from the university 19. When the cells are expressed for a certain protein they become endocrine cells, and another protein they become duct cells (see DRI´s paper above with a small dictionary). This is regulated by a signalling system called Notch, known since decades but unknown how Notch is turned on/off. Semb describes the process as a pinball game in the clip above, depending on which pin they hits decide the fate. The knowledge can be used how to produce more efficient insulin producing beta cells from human stem cells in lab. At the same time stem cells research are making progresses and it´s a very exciting area with huge potential for many diseases, it´s still challenging in many ways and particular the tumorigenic risk is not fully understood. Semb´s team said last year; “Although significant progress has been made towards making insulin producing beta cells in vitro (in the lab), we are still exploring how to mass-produce mature beta cells to meet the future clinical needs. Our current study contributes with valuable knowledge on how to address key technical challenges such as safety, purity and cost-effective manufacturing, aspects that if not confronted early on, could hinder stem cell therapy from becoming a clinically and commercially viable treatment in diabetes.” (20).

 My question was, can Sembs team’s protocol be used at the progenitor cells in a human pancreas as well, for self-replication and as the procedure DRI describes above? Not as a cure but until we knows more about risks with stem cells, to improve glucose management and control? I asked Professor Semb; “Probably not, our finding is not related to how progenitors divide, neither in organ development nor in a human adult. Our finding is rather how progenitors are instructed to develop to certain cell types, i.e. beta cells. This is useful to more efficient control that progenitors from stem cells becomes beta cells and nothing else”.

 The paper 21.

 

 

HUMAN TRIAL

It´s known that the neurotransmitter gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA, is important in both type 1 and 2 diabetes. Research have showed different levels of GABA in people with diabetes compared with healthy individuals. GABA is synthesized by an enzyme called GAD from the amino acid glutamate in nerve cells but also, importantly, in the insulin-producing beta cells in pancreatic islets (22). GAD has two forms, GAD65 and GAD67, and in type 1 diabetes the most common form of autoantibody is to GAD65, often referred to as GADA.

The roles of GABA in islets are many and one is to inhibit toxic white blood cells. An international research group led by Professor Per-Ola Carlsson at Uppsala University in Sweden, spring 2018 published two papers where they had isolated immune cells from human blood and studied the effects GABA had on these cells. First, they were able to determine GABA concentration in human islets, and showed that ion channels that GABA opens became more sensitive to GABA in type 2 diabetes and that GABA helps regulate insulin secretion (23). In the other paper they show that GABA inhibited the immune cells and reduced the secretion of a large number of inflammatory molecules (24.

 

Diamyd Medical is a Swedish company with several human trials ongoing, with different approach (the company 25, trials 26). Diamyd has developed a tablet, Remygen, based on GABA that in an experimental trial will be tested in humans at two different places (27). GABA together with Diamyd (antigen-specific immunotherapy, a vaccine) at University of Alabama (see more information in the link about trials above) and only GABA in 30 adult patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than five years (study name ReGenerate-1). I asked Professor Carlsson, leader of ReGenerate-1 about status, and first patient started last Monday. Still looking for participants. First phase of ReGenerate-1 is an initial safety and dose escalation part comprising six patients, and the main trial comprising 24 patients that will be followed for up to nine months depending on the dosage group they belong to. After safety evaluation, the plan is to see if Remygen can regenerate insulin producing cells, meaning increased own production of insulin. Final results planned in 2020, according to Carlsson. Personally I´m sceptic by nature, so I doubt this might be a cure. But again, all improvement in management of the disease that is possible is helpful for millions of people with insulin dependent diabetes, so I will follow up this for sure.

 

 

SUMMARY

There is obviously beta cells left in all with autoimmune diabetes, clinical irrelevant and still the disease means absolute deficiency. If and how those cells can be saved, increased or if they provide useful information how to resolve insulin production, is unknown today. There is a number of projects that try to convert alpha cells in the islet of Langerhans to beta cells, alpha cells are not attacked and destroyed in people with autoimmune diabetes. More about that in another article since I´m waiting for some results.

Research learns us more continuously, the human body is indeed complex. There won´t be a viable cure or a possible solution for increased insulin production until autoimmunity is solved, but if the researchers one day might be able to do that we rely on a method that doesn´t involve immunosuppressant’s. Otherwise it won´t be a solution for the majority.

Even though diabetes research suffer due to lack of donations there are exciting projects ongoing, in humans as well. Human trials are beyond important, even if experimental as with GABA we must move to humans to proceed. For this, diabetes research need funding since these trials are expensive.

As I wrote in the beginning, everything that might improve the management are beyond important. For a functional cure there are many challenges to tackle and a long way to go, but we will definitely continue to see small steps in a positive direction. Personally, I´m totally convinced we will see a cure, not in the near future and not if organisations get more funding.

 

References:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  3. https://www.touchendocrinology.com/articles/progress-islet-transplantation-over-last-15-years
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nrendo.2016.178
  5. https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/islet-cell-transplantation-program/ict-patient-information/islet-cell-transplantation-faqs
  6. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  7. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4308-1
  8. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-018-4763-3
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362259/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  11. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  12. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  13. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2018/05/14/dc18-0465
  14. https://news.yale.edu/2017/02/09/yale-scientists-study-how-some-insulin-producing-cells-survive-type-1-diabetes
  15. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30040-2
  16. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/file/research-publications/2018_Pancreatic-Progenitors-There-and-Back-Again_Trends-in-Endocrinology-and-Metabolism.pdf
  17. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/is-the-pancreas-regeneration-debate-settled
  18. https://www.jmaj.jp/detail.php?id=10.31662%2Fjmaj.2018-0005
  19. https://vimeo.com/303012751
  20. https://www.eurostemcell.org/de/towards-safe-and-scalable-cell-therapy-type-1-diabetes-simplifying-beta-cell-differentiation
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0762-2
  22. https://www.uu.se/en/news-media/news/article/?id=10440&typ=artikel
  23. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30098-7/fulltext
  24. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30103-8/fulltext
  25. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/About.aspx 
  26. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/clinicalTrials.aspx
  27. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/pressClips.aspx?ClipID=3085588

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics

 


 

Autoimmun diabetes är en sjukdom där immunförsvaret angriper och förstör frisk vävnad, i detta fallet betacellerna i de langerhanska öarna i bukspottskörteln (1). Det leder till absolut insulinbrist och en livslång behandling med insulin genom injektioner eller en insulinpump. Det finns inget sätt att preventivt förhindra sjukdomen hos människor, trots att vi sedan länge kan upptäcka biomarkörer för att sjukdomen är under utveckling (kanske det mest spännande preventionsförsöket skrev jag om häromdagen 2). Det finns inget funktionellt botemedel, men många lovande försök pågår på olika platser i världen.

 

UTMANINGAR MED ETT BOTEMEDEL

En rad experiment pågår för att försöka ersätta förstörda betaceller med framförarallt stamceller, vilket är det mest spännande området i detta avseende. För att komma vidare finns en mängd utmaningar, de viktigaste har jag listat ett flertal gånger i min kategori/tagg stamceller på min hemsida (http://www.diabethics.com/science/category/stamceller/):

 

  • Dagens transplantationer av ö-celler innebär att vi nyttjar celler från donatorer som innebär begränsningar av naturliga orsaker. Proceduren har utvecklats mycket sedan ”the Edmonton protocol” år 2000 (3), och även om många fortfarande behöver ta insulin har metoden hjälpt många till ett bättre liv. Tills idag har ~2000 transplantationer med ö-celler genomförts i världen (4). Utöver brist på donatorer, en annan viktig anledning till att metoden inte används oftare är att patienten resten av livet måste ta immunosuppression (avstötningsmedel). Dessa kan ge mer eller mindre otrevliga biverkningar såsom munsår, blodbrist (man blir trött), illamående, kräkningar, diarré, bensvullnad, högt kolesterol, leverproblem, högt blodtryck, trötthet, njurproblem, onormal menstruationscykel hos kvinnor och ökad infektionsrisk. De kan äve öka risken att utveckla cancer. Observera, allt detta är risk och inte utfall (5). Uppsala universitet som tillhör de främsta i världen i området, säger ”huvudmålet för ö-cellstransplantation är att förhindra svåra eller livshotande hypo- respektive hyperglykemier (28).
  • Om vi kunde lösa bristen på betaceller och insulinproduktion med något som är kroppseget, hur skulle immunförsvaret reagera? Det finns flera studier som har visat att många patienter många år efter diagnos fortsatt har autoantikroppar kvar. Särskilt de som insjuknat som vuxen och överlag de som haft autoantikroppen GADA har visat positivt test senare, mindre vanligt förekommande hos barn som haft IAA (eller ICA på engelska, (6). Vad innebär detta, om vi lyckas ersätta insulinproduktionen, kommer de nya cellerna angripas och förstöras? Vi vet inte, vi kan inte idag ersätta insulinproduktion men högst troligt ja, de nya cellerna skulle förstöras hos patienter med kvarstående autoantikroppar. Detta sagt även om det i flera år blivit allt mer tydligt att autoantikropparna är mer biomarkörer och har mindre roll i destruktionen av betaceller (7, 29).
  • För att lösa allt ovan, att undvika att ersatta celler förstörs samt immunosuppression, pågår flera försök med inkapsling av betaceller från donatorer men främst av stamceller framtagna betaceller. Jag har i kategorin stamceller ovan många artiklar i ämnet. Idag finns ingen fungerande metod men detta är ett av de mest spännande områdena för ett presumtivt botemedel mot insulinbehandlad diabetes.
  • Oavsett hur vi en dag kan återskapa insulinproduktion, för ett funktionellt botemedel måste vi veta etiologin, orsaken, till sjukdomen och kunna stoppa det autoreaktiva angreppet. Som alla som följt mig en tid vet är detta ett område jag ibland känner åsidosätts. Incidensen av autoimmun diabetes har ökat dramatiskt i många länder, liksom i Sverige, sett över sista 30 åren. En ny studie publicerades häromdagen som visade en årlig ökning om 3% i 25 länder i Europa, 8. I Sverige, med näst högst incidens i världen efter Finland och med en befolkning om 10 miljoner, insjuknar årligen 900 barn och minst lika många vuxna. Sorglig utveckling och den hälsoekonomiska effekten är dessutom mycket stor.

 

 

ANDRA SÄTT ATT LÖSA INSULINSEKRETION?

Ett intressant område har i många år varit att titta mot de kvarstående betaceller vi alla har. Det är nämligen väletablerat att alla med autoimmun diabetes har absolut insulinbrist, men samtidigt har en mycket liten mängd betaceller kvar. Inte motsägelsefullt. Vid diagnos har vi i regel förlorat 80-90% av alla betaceller, detta är väl känt (9). Destruktionen fortsätter, på lite olika sätt hos olika människor. Observera igen, de få betaceller vi har kvar att ingen med autoimmun diabetes kan leva utan tillfört insulin, oavsett om vederbörande lever på vatten och isbergssallad.

Tyvärr kan vi inte studera betacells-förlust, vi kan endast mäta C-peptid (10). Detta har gjorts i flera välkontrollerade studier (11, 12, 13) och har lett till frågorna;

  • Varför finns celler som undgår angreppet?
  • Eller, angrips de men överlever?
  • Kan detta utnyttjas på något sätt?

 

Vi vet inte idag varför en del betaceller undgår angrepp. Kevan Herold med kollegor visade förra året att vid utvecklandet av typ 1 diabetes förändras vissa betaceller till en slags subkategori, och det blir två liknande grupper men ändå olika typer av betaceller. Subkategorin undkommer det autoimmuna angreppet tack vare att de ”duckar och tar skydd för angreppet”. Cellerna framkallar molekyler som förhindrar angrepp, och de efterliknar något som liknar stamceller, dvs de backar i utvecklingsstadiet och genom detta kan de överleva angreppet och även föröka sig trots autoimmuna angreppet (artikel från Yale 14, studien 15, min artikel 30). Bilden från mitt inlägg då:

 

 

I decennier har funnits en teori om att progenitor-celler existerar i bukspottskörteln. Detta är ungefär ättlingar till stamceller som kan förnya sig själv och utvecklas till mogna/färdiga celler, DRI förklarar det bra i studien nedan; “cells that exhibit a variable degree of potency and proliferation potential. The potency and role of adult progenitor cells is organ and context-specific”. För flera år sedan utmanades denna teori och en del forskare menade att vad vi i själva verket sett är självreplikering, skillnaderna är flera men primärt är det så, att om självreplikering är vad vi sett är kapaciteten högst begränsad med anledning av hur extremt få celler som överlevt det autoimmuna angreppet. Oavsett så visar studierna ovan fortsatt avtagande insulinproduktion (C-peptid) från en redan låg nivå, så det återskapande av betaceller som eventuellt sker är inte kliniskt relevant. Men vad som är intressant är, om vi en dag kan häva autoimmuniteten, kan vi påverka återskapandet av celler?

 

 

HUR GÅ VIDARE?

Hos djur sker betacellsproliferation ganska lätt. Proliferation innebär händelser leder till ökat antal celler, främst celldelning men inte bara. Kliniskt relevant betacellsproliferation sker inte hos människor. Om vi skulle lyckas påverka återskapande av betaceller hos människor med absolut insulinbrist skulle alla eventuella förbättringar ha positiv effekt på möjligheten till glukoskontroll. Högst troligt inte som ett botemedel dock. En studie om betacellsproliferation publicerades förra veckan, veckan innan det en studie vad som bestämmer ödet för en progenitor-cell (läs mer nedan) att bli en insulinproducerande betacell och den tredje nyheten är ett mycket spännande humanförsök som precis startats i Sverige. Olika forskningsinriktningar men idén är den samma: att återskapa delar eller all insulinproduktion.

 

 

DIABETES RESEARCH INSTITUTE – DRI

DRI vid universitetet i Miami publicerade en studie den 4 december i “Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism” där forskarna visar att ja, det finns progenitor-celler i bukspottskörteln hos en vuxen människa (studien 16, artikel från DRI 17). Den största skillnaden i fallet att återskapa insulinproduktion mellan progenitor-celler och stamceller, är att idag måste patienten ta immunosuppressiva läkemedel om vi använder embryonala stamceller eller så måste de kapslas in, vilket fortsatt i sig kan kräva immunosuppression. Om vi en dag kan använda iPSC (inducerade pluripotenta stamceller, se mina tidigare artiklar om detta), kanske vi kan undvika immunosuppression. Detta är som sagt det mest spännande området men en lösning är inte nära, det tar år och vi ser inte ännu humanförsök, förutom att andra sjukdomar nu börjat försök med i Japan (18). Progenitor-celler är kroppsegna vilket innebär att ingen immunosuppression behövs, men kan de stimuleras till att bli insulinproducerande betaceller genom neogenes (“de novo formation, e. g., of b-cells from non-b-cells. When applied to the generation of a new differentiated cell, this concept is usually presented as an alternative to self-replication e.g., a b-cell giving rise to two b-cells by proliferation”. Från den lilla ordboken DRI har i studien ovan)? Det återstår att se.

 

 

HELMHOLTZ ZENTRUM MÜNCHEN

Forskare från Köpenhamns universitet samt Helmholtz Zentrum München German research center for environmental research, ledda av professor Henrik Semb, visade i Nature för två veckor sedan tjusigt de signaler som bestämmer ödet för progenitor-celler i ett lab. Semb beskriver deras fynd kort i ett klipp från universitet här 19. När cellerna uttrycks för ett visst protein blir endokrina celler, ett annat protein så blir de till duktala celler (se ordlistan igen för förklaring). Detta regleras genom ett signalsystem kallat Notch, känt i decennier men okänt hur Notch stängs av/på. Semb beskriver det likt ett flipperspel i klippet ovan, beroende på vad de träffar avgör deras öde. Kunskapen kan användas för att ta fram mer effektiva insulinproducerande betaceller från humana stamceller i lab. Samtidigt som stamcellsforskningen gör stora framsteg hela tiden och är ett otroligt spännande område med stor potential för många sjukdomar, finns utmaningar och inte minst eventuell tumörogen risk är inte tillräckligt känd. Sembs team sa förra året; Although significant progress has been made towards making insulin producing beta cells in vitro (in the lab), we are still exploring how to mass-produce mature beta cells to meet the future clinical needs. Our current study contributes with valuable knowledge on how to address key technical challenges such as safety, purity and cost-effective manufacturing, aspects that if not confronted early on, could hinder stem cell therapy from becoming a clinically and commercially viable treatment in diabetes.” (20).

 

Min omedelbara fundering var, kan det fynd Sembs team gjort användas även på progenitor-cellerna likväl, för att påverka självreplikering likt det DRI beskriver ovan? Inte som botemedel men tills vi vet mer om risker med stamceller, för att förbättra behandlingen av insulinberoende diabetes och chanserna till glukoskontroll? Jag frågade Henrik Semb; Troligen inte, vårt fynd relaterar inte hur progenitor-celler delar sig, varken i ett organ eller hos en vuxen människa. Fynden visar istället hur progenitorer instrueras att utvecklas till olika cell typer, bl a beta celler. Detta blir användbart då man vill effektivt styra progenitorer från stamceller att bli beta celler och inte någon annan cell.”

 

 Studien 21.

 

HUMANFÖRSÖK

Det är känt att nervtransmittorn gamma-aminosmörsyra (GABA) har betydelse för både autoimmun diabetes och typ 2 diabetes. Forskning har visat olika nivåer av GABA hos personer med diabetes jämför med friska individer. GABA syntetiseras med hjälp av ett enzym som kallas GAD, dels från aminosyran glutamat i nervceller, men också i de insulinproducerande betacellerna i Langerhanska öar i bukspottskörteln (22). GAD finns i två former, GAD65 och GAD67, och intressant nog är den vanligaste autoantikroppen vid autoimmun diabetes just mot GAD65, oftast benämnd bara som GADA.

GABA´s roll i cellöarna är flera och en är att hämma toxiska vita blodkroppar. En internationell forskargrupp ledd av professor Per-Ola Carlsson vid Uppsalas universitet publicerade våren 2018 två studier där de hade isolerat immunceller från blod från människor och tittat på effekten GABA haft på dessa celler. Först lyckades de bestämma GABA´s fysiologiska koncentrationsnivå i cellöar, och visade att jonkanaler som GABA öppnar blir mer känsliga för GABA vid typ 2 diabetes och att GABA hjälper att reglera insulinsekretionen (23). I den andra studien visade de att GABA hämmade immunceller och minskade utsöndring av flera inflammatoriska molekyler (24).

 

Diamyd Medical är ett svenskt företag med flera pågående kliniska studier, med lite olika inriktningar (företaget 25, försök 26). Diamyd har utvecklat ett läkemedel, Remygen, baserat på GABA som i ett experimentellt humanförsök skall testas på två olika platser (27). GABA tillsammans med Diamyd (31) vid University of Alabama (läs mer i länkarna ovan) samt endast GABA på 30 vuxna patienter som haft autoimmun diabetes mer än fem år (ReGenerate-1). Jag frågade Per-Ola om status och första patienten startade i måndags förra veckan. Första fasen är en säkerhets och doseskaleringsdel med 6 patienter, för att sedan utökas med 24 patienter till som kommer följas upp till nio månader beroende på vilken doseringsgrupp de tillhör. Efter utvärdering av säkerheten är planen att se om Remygen kan generera ökat antal betaceller och därmed ökad insulinproduktion. Slutgiltigt resultat planeras 2020 enligt Per-Ola. Av hävd är jag skeptisk så jag är tveksam till att detta är ett botemedel. Men igen, all eventuell förbättring av behandlingen av autoimmun diabetes som är möjlig innebär mycket för de miljoner världen över som har sjukdomen, så jag kommer följa upp detta naturligtvis.

 

OBS! Per-Ola bad mig om hjälp att ragga deltagare till ReGenerate-1. Kriterier är att du skall vara 18-50 år, haft autoimmun diabetes minst 5 år och ha lågt eller obefintligt C-peptid. Intresserad, kontakta studiens koordinator Rebecka.Hilmius@akademiska.se.

 

 

SUMMERING

Uppenbarligen har alla några betaceller kvar vid autoimmun diabetes, kliniskt irrelevant och fortsatt innebär sjukdomen absolut insulinbrist. Om och hur eventuellt några celler kan räddas, ökas eller om de ger värdefull information hur vi en dag kan återskapa insulinproduktion, är idag oklart. Det finns ett flertal projekt som idag försöker konvertera alfaceller i langerhanska öarna att bli betaceller, alfaceller undgår angreppet och förstörs således inte hos oss med autoimmun diabetes. Jag kommer skriva om detta igen, jag inväntar resultat från ett par studier.

Forskarna lär oss mycket hela tiden, människokroppen är uppenbarligen komplex. Det kommer inte att finnas ett funktionellt botemedel eller en lösning för förbättrad insulinproduktion förrän autoimmuniteten är löst, men om forskarna löser även den gåtan kan vi inte förlita oss på att nyttja immunosuppression. Annars kommer det inte att vara en lösning för majoriteten av oss.

Trots att diabetesforskningen lider av brist på medel pågår intressanta projekt, på människor likväl. Humanförsök är mer än viktigt, även om experimentell likt GABA så måste vi flytta från djur till människor för att komma vidare. För detta behöver forskningen medel, humanförsök är kostsamma.

Som jag skrev i början, allt som möjligen kan förbättra möjligheterna att behandla sjukdomen är väldigt viktigt. För ett funktionellt botemedel finns många utmaningar och en lång väg att gå, men vi kommer garanterat fortsättningsvis se små steg i rätt riktning. Personligen är jag fortsatt övertygad om att vi kommer se ett botemedel, inte nära i framtiden och definitivt inte om inte forskningen får medel.

 

Referenser:

  1. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/types/
  2. http://www.diabethics.com/science/human-prevention-trial-cvb/
  3. https://www.touchendocrinology.com/articles/progress-islet-transplantation-over-last-15-years
  4. https://www.nature.com/articles/nrendo.2016.178
  5. https://www.cityofhope.org/research/research-overview/islet-cell-transplantation-program/ict-patient-information/islet-cell-transplantation-faqs
  6. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/51/6/1754
  7. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4308-1
  8. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-018-4763-3
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362259/
  10. http://www.diabethics.com/diabetes/cpeptide/
  11. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/38/3/476
  12. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/10/1664
  13. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/early/2018/05/14/dc18-0465
  14. https://news.yale.edu/2017/02/09/yale-scientists-study-how-some-insulin-producing-cells-survive-type-1-diabetes
  15. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(17)30040-2
  16. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/file/research-publications/2018_Pancreatic-Progenitors-There-and-Back-Again_Trends-in-Endocrinology-and-Metabolism.pdf
  17. https://www.diabetesresearch.org/is-the-pancreas-regeneration-debate-settled
  18. https://www.jmaj.jp/detail.php?id=10.31662%2Fjmaj.2018-0005
  19. https://vimeo.com/303012751
  20. https://www.eurostemcell.org/de/towards-safe-and-scalable-cell-therapy-type-1-diabetes-simplifying-beta-cell-differentiation
  21. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0762-2
  22. https://www.uu.se/en/news-media/news/article/?id=10440&typ=artikel
  23. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30098-7/fulltext
  24. https://www.ebiomedicine.com/article/S2352-3964(18)30103-8/fulltext
  25. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/About.aspx 
  26. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/clinicalTrials.aspx
  27. https://www.diamyd.com/docs/pressClips.aspx?ClipID=3085588
  28. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/Artificial-Pancreas/
  29. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/autoimmun-diabetes-etiologi/
  30. (Swedish only) http://www.diabethics.com/science/insulinproduktion/
  31. (Swedish only) https://www.diabethics.com/science/gad-alum/

 

 

Hans Jönsson
Diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethics
https://www.facebook.com/diabethicssverige/
https://www.instagram.com/diabethics